• 9 minutes WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 11 minutes The EU Loses The Principles On Which It Was Built
  • 19 minutes Batteries Could Be a Small Dotcom-Style Bubble
  • 1 hour Downloadable 3D Printed Gun Designs, Yay or Nay?
  • 3 hours Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 2 hours Rattling With Weapons: Iran Must Develop Military To Guard Against Other Powers
  • 8 hours Permian already crested the productivity bell curve - downward now to Tier 2 geological locations
  • 5 hours Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 59 mins China goes against US natural gas
  • 9 hours CO2 Emissions Hit 67-Year Low In USA, As Rest-Of-World Rises
  • 4 hours Corporations Are Buying More Renewables Than Ever
  • 18 hours Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 18 hours The Discount Airline Model Is Coming for Europe’s Railways
  • 20 hours How To Explain 'Truth Isn't Truth' Comment of Rudy Giuliani?
  • 11 hours Saudi PIF In Talks To Invest In Tesla Rival Lucid
  • 12 hours Film on Venezuela's staggering collapse
Is Mexico Set To Boost Oil Output?

Is Mexico Set To Boost Oil Output?

Mexico’s president-elect is determined to…

Indonesia’s Oil Sector In Jeopardy As Elections Loom

Indonesia’s Oil Sector In Jeopardy As Elections Loom

With elections right around the…

US Naval Research Team Powers Radio-Controlled Aircraft With Seawater

A US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) team has turned seawater into a hydrocarbon fuel, and used it to power a radio-controlled aircraft with an unmodified internal combustion engine. According to Dr Heather Willauer, the team’s leader, the fuel could eventually be used to power the Navy’s fleet of ships, allowing them to stay at sea longer and avoid travelling to dangerous refuelling regions.

The process takes the CO2 and hydrogen in seawater and recombines it over a catalyst, similar to those used for Fischer–Tropsch reduction and the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide, to create the liquid fuel. Although initial production costs are expected to be high (between $3 and $6 per gallon), its longterm potential for the US Navy is huge, says Willauer: “The potential payoff is the ability to produce fuel at sea, reducing the logistics tail on fuel delivery with no environmental burden and increasing the Navy’s energy security and independence.

But the scope extends beyond the Navy’s fuel security. Depending on the base metal used in the catalyst (iron, cobalt, nickel or copper, for example), seawater could be turned into methanol and natural gas, which could be used for green energy generation. “Another potential benefit”, says Will Dawson, Head of Energy at Forum for the Future, “would seem to be a slower rate of ocean acidification, which is killing habitats such as coral reefs”.

The logic runs that, by using a fuel made from already emitted carbon, we wouldn’t be increasing the ocean’s CO2 content further. The long-term outcome could be that the ocean’s increasing pH levels slow down, and even eventually stop.

However, the fuel has only just passed the proof of concept stage and the NRL believes it won’t be commercially viable for another decade. “It’s not necessarily going to be the one and only solution to alternative fuels”, says Willauer. “It’s just one solution that hopefully many people are going to use.”

By Amanda Saint of greenfutures magazine



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment
  • grey eminence on August 29 2014 said:
    Navy is on the right track but wrong technology.

    http://thomasinstitute.weebly.com/

    Shortly will have an animation presentation showing
    a new carbon economny that will make money for the
    lay person.
  • Ken on August 03 2014 said:
    This is revolutionary. At the same time, it will totally negate Putin's antics.
    Everything that's going up in flames right now is as a result of his dream of
    sequestering all of the oil and gas production capacity of the World Island
    (including the vast gas deposits off the coast of Israel, using Hamas terror
    as a way of delaying their entry into the gas market). The problem facing
    Putin is that there is now a huge volume of shipping available to ship LNG
    (liquefied natural gas) that by far exceeds pipeline capacity. If he cut off
    the valves of the pipelines delivering to Europe, the tankers would make up
    for it immediately.

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News