• 6 minutes WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 14 minutes Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 18 minutes California Solar Mandate Based on False Facts
  • 1 hour Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 1 hour Monsanto hit by $289 Million for cancerous weedkiller
  • 8 hours WTI @ 69.33 headed for $70s - $80s end of August
  • 4 hours Why hydrogen economics is does not work
  • 5 mins Anyone Worried About the Lira Dragging EVERYTHING Else Down?
  • 7 hours WSJ *still* refuses to acknowledge U.S. Shale Oil industry's horrible economics and debts
  • 12 hours Saudi Production Cut or Demand Drop?
  • 20 mins Oil prices---Tug of War: Sanctions vs. Trade War
  • 26 mins Correlation does not equal causation, but they do tend to tango on occasion
  • 33 mins Russia retaliate: Our Response to U.S. Sanctions Will Be Precise And Painful
  • 10 hours Merkel, Putin to discuss Syria, Ukraine, Nord Stream 2
  • 13 hours What Turkey Sanctions Are Really About
  • 6 hours Saudi Aramco IPO Seems Unlikely
Oil Falls Despite Crude Inventory Draw

Oil Falls Despite Crude Inventory Draw

Oil prices fell on Wednesday…

What Would A Hard Brexit Mean For British Oil?

What Would A Hard Brexit Mean For British Oil?

Despite nearly 14 months of…

Scientists Unveil How the Deep Ocean Traps Carbon

The Southern Ocean operates as an absorber of carbon dioxide emissions from burning fossil fuels, but until now scientists were in the dark as to how these ocean depths were actually locking carbon in.

Last week, scientists released a new study on the Southern Ocean, claiming to have unlocked the mystery. According to scientists involved in the research, the currents that transport carbon from the surface to the depths take place only at specific places in the ocean where there is a very exact combination of winds, currents and whirlpools to draw carbon into the ocean depths and lock it away. Some of these specific currents are as wide as 1,000 kilometers, the scientists said. 

"By identifying the mechanisms responsible for taking carbon out of the surface layer in the ocean, we're in a much better situation to talk about how climate change might impact that process," said oceanographer Richard Matear, one of the authors of the Southern Ocean study published in the journal Nature Geoscience, told Reuters.

According to the study, these currents lock away some 1.5 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions every year, which is more than the equivalent of Japan’s entire annual greenhouse gas emissions.

On the flip side, however, the same scientists expressed concern that the warming climate could affect this process, though the potential impact remains unknown.

By. Jen Alic of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News