• 4 minutes Is $60/Bbl WTI still considered a break even for Shale Oil
  • 7 minutes Oil Price Editorial: Beware Of Saudi Oil Tanker Sabotage Stories
  • 11 minutes Mueller Report Brings Into Focus Obama's Attempted Coup Against Trump
  • 15 minutes Wonders of Shale- Gas,bringing investments and jobs to the US
  • 8 hours Apartheid Is Still There: Post-apartheid South Africa Is World’s Most Unequal Country
  • 11 hours Evil Awakens: Fascist Symbols And Rhetoric On Rise In Italian EU Vote
  • 12 hours Total nonsense in climate debate
  • 2 mins Theresa May to Step Down
  • 40 mins Visualizing How Much Oil Is In An Electric Vehicle (Hint: a heckuva lot)
  • 12 hours IRAN makes threats, rattles sabre . . . . U.S. makes threats, rattles sabre . . . . IRAQ steps up and plays the mediator. THIS ALLOWS BOTH SIDES TO "SAVE FACE". Then serious negotiations start.
  • 2 hours Look at the LONGER TERM bigger picture of international oil & gas. Ignore temporary hiccups.
  • 15 hours Will Canada drop Liberals, vote in Conservatives?
  • 1 day IMO 2020 could create fierce competition for scarce water resources
  • 2 days Level-Headed Analysis of the Future of U.S. Shale Oil Industry
  • 11 hours Apple Boycott in China
  • 7 hours Australian Voters Reject 'Climate Change' Politicians
  • 15 hours Canada's Uncivil Oil War : 78% of Voters Cite *Energy* as the Top Issue
Headline Hysteria Suggests Tesla Reversal

Headline Hysteria Suggests Tesla Reversal

There’s been good reason to…

Scientists Unveil How the Deep Ocean Traps Carbon

The Southern Ocean operates as an absorber of carbon dioxide emissions from burning fossil fuels, but until now scientists were in the dark as to how these ocean depths were actually locking carbon in.

Last week, scientists released a new study on the Southern Ocean, claiming to have unlocked the mystery. According to scientists involved in the research, the currents that transport carbon from the surface to the depths take place only at specific places in the ocean where there is a very exact combination of winds, currents and whirlpools to draw carbon into the ocean depths and lock it away. Some of these specific currents are as wide as 1,000 kilometers, the scientists said. 

"By identifying the mechanisms responsible for taking carbon out of the surface layer in the ocean, we're in a much better situation to talk about how climate change might impact that process," said oceanographer Richard Matear, one of the authors of the Southern Ocean study published in the journal Nature Geoscience, told Reuters.

According to the study, these currents lock away some 1.5 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions every year, which is more than the equivalent of Japan’s entire annual greenhouse gas emissions.

On the flip side, however, the same scientists expressed concern that the warming climate could affect this process, though the potential impact remains unknown.

By. Jen Alic of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News