• 3 days Statoil Changes Name
  • 4 days Nuclear Bomb = Nuclear War: Saudi Arabia Will Develop Nuclear Bomb If Iran Does
  • 4 days Tillerson just sacked ... how will market react?
  • 3 days Russian hackers targeted American energy grid
  • 4 hours Country With Biggest Oil Reserves Biggest Threat to World Economy
  • 4 days Petrobras Narrows 2017 Loss, Net Debt Falls Below $85bn
  • 3 days Is $71 As Good As It Gets For Oil Bulls This Year?
  • 4 days Proton battery-alternative for lithium?
  • 4 days Ford Recalls 1.38 Million Vehicles (North America) For Loose Steering Wheel Bolt
  • 3 days Oil Boom Will Help Ghana To Be One Of The Fastest Growing¨Economies By 2018!
  • 4 days I vote for Exxon
  • 4 days South Korea Would Suspend Five Coal - Fire Power Plants.
  • 3 days HAPPY RIG COUNT DAY!!
  • 4 days UK vs. Russia - Britain Expels 23 Russian Diplomats Over Chemical Attack On Ex-Spy.
  • 4 days Why is gold soooo boring?
  • 3 days Spotify to file $1 billion IPO
Colombia’s Fracking Dilemma

Colombia’s Fracking Dilemma

Fracking is quickly becoming a…

The Oil Canal That May Never Be

The Oil Canal That May Never Be

Thailand’s Kra canal project could…

Zainab Calcuttawala

Zainab Calcuttawala

Zainab Calcuttawala is an American journalist based in Morocco. She completed her undergraduate coursework at the University of Texas at Austin (Hook’em) and reports on…

More Info

Samsung’s Graphene-Based Battery Charges In 12 Minutes


Samsung is adding graphene to its lithium batteries to make them last longer and charge faster, according to emerging reports.

The Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT) created “graphene balls” to increase battery capacity by 45 percent and charge up to five times more quickly. The company says the innovation could allow the new battery to charge fully in just 12 minutes, making it suitable for cell phones and electric cars alike.

Electronics manufacturers have taken to graphene, raising its status to a “miracle material” due to its strength, conductivity, and elasticity.

“It is a great technology with various potential applications but it will take a long time for graphene-based batteries to be mass produced,” Kim Young-woo at SK Securities told the Financial Times. “The key is who can commercialize the technology first. It won’t be easy to apply the minute processing technology for large-scale production of high-quality, electronics-grade graphene.”

Samsung has had to invest heavily in battery research since the exploding Note 7 fiasco of 2016. Worldwide, battery research is becoming a top priority as renewables and consumer electronics take over economies and markets.

Forschungszentrum Juelich researchers with American Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientists have now successfully observed how deposits form at the iron electrode during operation. A deeper understanding of the charging and discharging reactions is viewed as the key for the further development of this type of rechargeable battery to gain market maturity.

Iron-air batteries promise a considerably higher energy density than present-day lithium-ion batteries. Additionally, their main constituent – iron – is an abundant and therefore quite low-cost material. The Forschungszentrum Jülich scientists are among the driving forces in the renewed research into this concept that was discovered in the 1970s.

By Zainab Calcuttawala for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:

Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment
  • Justin on November 28 2017 said:

    Graphene is cancerous?

    The only current manufacturing of graphene is in tennis rackets and ink so I guess you should be careful with paper. Also our bodies are made of carbon so how is 2 dimensional (at the atomic level) carbon structure going to cause an issue in your body?

    If that doesn't stop your concern worldwide production of graphene balls is currently measured in grams.
  • Patrick on November 28 2017 said:
    While the article jumps to another tech, the iron version purposed is lightweight and modern.

    The trick is the graphene balls. These are cancerous. They have similar inflammatory properties as asbestos. Carbon doesn't get broken down by the body in this form. Think about an accident. The batteries rupture. Now you've got micro particles floating around in the air and smoke: terrible for victims and first responders alike.

    This might be mitigated if there is some form of encapsulation technology. Perhaps an expansion foam like in Demolition Man. Without some kind of protection, this is another mesothelioma waiting to happen.
  • Philip C Branton on November 28 2017 said:
    We do not need lead or iron batteries due to the weight.

    What woman is going to use a lead or iron based battery? How many women change their own batteries now with lead acid?

    This article needs some clarity....

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News