• 5 minutes Mike Shellman's musings on "Cartoon of the Week"
  • 11 minutes Permian already crested the productivity bell curve - downward now to Tier 2 geological locations
  • 17 minutes WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 1 day The Discount Airline Model Is Coming for Europe’s Railways
  • 12 hours Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 7 hours Renewable Energy Could "Effectively Be Free" by 2030
  • 21 hours Pakistan: "Heart" Of Terrorism and Global Threat
  • 25 mins Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 8 hours Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 1 day Venezuela set to raise gasoline prices to international levels.
  • 20 hours Are Trump's steel tariffs working? Seems they are!
  • 2 days WTI @ 69.33 headed for $70s - $80s end of August
  • 2 days Scottish Battery ‘Breakthrough’ Could Charge Electric Cars In Seconds
  • 1 hour Why hydrogen economics does not work
  • 1 day Corporations Are Buying More Renewables Than Ever
  • 17 mins China goes against US natural gas

Russia Tests Aerial Spent Nuclear Fuel Transport Containers

The Russian Federal Nuclear Center in Sarov has completed successful tests of the world's first aerial transport container for spent nuclear fuel from research reactors.

The Russian Federal Nuclear Center in Sarov in Nizhnii Novgorod oblast undertook the reportedly successful tests, the Press Center of Nuclear Energy and Industry reported.

The tests involved transport packaging containers for transporting spent nuclear fuel from TUK-145/S research reactors by air and were undertaken in order ascertain that the containers met the requirements of Russian and international regulations applied for S-type containers used for transporting research reactors’ spent nuclear fuel by air.

The spent nuclear fuel TUK-145/S research reactor container package tested by the Russian Federal Nuclear Center in Sarov is a SKODA VRVR/M in a protective shock-absorbing cover constructed of titanium spheres that are designed to remain hermetically sealed on collision with a target at the speed of 300 feet per second, the average speed at which the container falls to earth from an altitude of 3,200 feet. The SKODA VRVR/M’s protective shock-absorbing cover was a joint design by the Sosny Science and Production Firm Limited Liability Company and the Russian Federal Nuclear Center All-Russia Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics Federal State Unitary Enterprise.

By. Charles Kennedy, Deputy Editor OilPrice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News