• 5 minutes Malaysia's Petronas vs. Sarawak Court Case - Will It End Up In London Courts?
  • 9 minutes Sell out now or hold on?
  • 16 minutes Oil prices going down
  • 4 hours Oil prices going down
  • 9 hours After Three Decade Macedonia End Dispute With Greece, new name: the Republic of Northern Macedonia
  • 43 mins Sell out now or hold on?
  • 13 hours What If Canada Had Wind and Not Oilsands?
  • 8 hours Two Koreas Agree To March Together At Asian Games
  • 7 hours Oil and Trade War
  • 2 hours Malaysia's Petronas vs. Sarawak Court Case - Will It End Up In London Courts?
  • 1 min Correlation Between Oil Sweet Spots and Real Estate Hot Spots
  • 2 hours When will oil demand start declining due to EVs?
  • 13 hours Australia mulls LNG import
  • 4 hours Trump Hits China With Tariffs On $50 Billion Of Goods
  • 9 hours Geopolitical and Political Risks make their strong comeback to global oil and gas markets
  • 1 day The Wonderful U.S. Oil Trade Deficit with Canada
  • 1 day We Need A Lasting Solution To The Lies Told By Big Oil and API
  • 24 hours The Permian Mystery
  • 1 hour Germany Orders Daimler to Recall 774,000 Diesel Cars in Europe
EV Makers Receive Little Support From Trump

EV Makers Receive Little Support From Trump

Electric vehicle makers find themselves…

3 Possible Outcomes From The OPEC Meeting

3 Possible Outcomes From The OPEC Meeting

With the OPEC meeting nearing,…

Research Finds That Increased Coal Use May Cause Droughts

Peabody Coal Mining

Continued reliance on energy derived from coal may have an unintended consequence to the environment in the countries where it is burned the most, according to a new study.

Along with all the negative health effects associated with coal-burning, the study published in the Journal of Climate concludes that if China and India keep increasing their share of coal-derived power, precipitation over a large expanse of land masses would be suppressed, resulting in drought conditions. The researchers looked at two scenarios: one, a high-coal use future, where energy demand in Asia necessitates rapid increases in the burning of coal; and a second scenario where impacts of coal use are shifted by using cleaner-burning natural gas and renewables.

In the high-coal-use scenario where emissions double their year 2000 benchmark levels from 2030 to 2100, increased sulfate aerosols – mostly black carbon and sulfur dioxide (SO2) – released into the atmosphere would offset warming from greenhouse gas emissions including carbon dioxide, resulting in a cooling effect throughout the Northern Hemisphere, along with South Asia and Southeast Asia. The cooling effects would suppress rainfall.

Related: Germany About To Make Big Changes To Its Renewables Policy

“For the high-emissions scenario, we found reductions in rainfall across much of Asia, especially East Asia (including China) and South Asia (including India), and a remote effect leading to a possible increase in rainfall in Australia as well as a suppression of rainfall in the Sahel region of Africa,” says Benjamin Grandey, a research scientist at the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology. “We see more reductions in rainfall than increases, especially in regions already struggling with water resources.”

Of course, whether the study's scenario comes to fruition is highly speculative, considering the moribund coal market and recent efforts made in China to combat pollution. In Beijing, for example, all coal-fired power plants will be banned by 2020. Still, as MIT News points out, coal remains the primary source of electricity throughout Asia.

For the high-emissions scenario, we found reductions in rainfall across much of Asia, especially East Asia (including China) and South Asia (including India)

Related: Beleaguered Chesapeake to Sell Off More Assets to Reduce $9B Debt

In December the International Energy Agency reported that "peak coal" in China is drawing near, noting that coal consumption has fallen for the last two years.

Lately China, the world’s largest coal consumer, is stepping up efforts to shrink both oversupply and a worsening pollution crisis in its major cities by reducing the number of working days for its coal miners to 276 a year from 330.

Between them, China and India accounted for 98 percent of the increase in world coal trade between 2008 and 2013, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). However the administration last November noted that data for 2014 and 2015 indicated a reversal of this trend, with declines in China's coal imports currently on pace to more than offset slight increases in other countries in both years.

By Andrew Topf via Mining.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News