• 5 minutes Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 11 minutes Don't Expect Too Much: Despite a Soaring Economy, America's Annual Pay Increase Isn't Budging
  • 15 minutes WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 11 hours The EU Loses The Principles On Which It Was Built
  • 3 hours Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 5 hours Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 20 hours Crude Price going to $62.50
  • 7 hours Why hydrogen economics does not work
  • 4 hours Tesla Faces 3 Lawsuits Over “Funding Secured” Tweet
  • 4 hours Again Google: Brazil May Probe Google Over Its Cell Phone System
  • 2 days Anyone Worried About the Lira Dragging EVERYTHING Else Down?
  • 17 hours WSJ *still* refuses to acknowledge U.S. Shale Oil industry's horrible economics and debts
  • 1 day Chinese EV Startup Nio Files for $1.8 billion IPO
  • 2 days Oil prices---Tug of War: Sanctions vs. Trade War
  • 2 days Correlation does not equal causation, but they do tend to tango on occasion
  • 2 days Russia retaliate: Our Response to U.S. Sanctions Will Be Precise And Painful
Oil Demand Growth Starts To Weaken In Asia

Oil Demand Growth Starts To Weaken In Asia

Oil demand from Asia’s key…

Deciphering The New Caspian Agreement

Deciphering The New Caspian Agreement

The Caspian deal is a…

Report Finds Coal Industry Causes 22,300 Premature Deaths a Year in Europe

The Institute for Energy Economics at the Stuttgart University has just a released a report, commissioned by Greenpeace International, that studied the health impacts of the coal industry in Europe.

Fumes released by the EU’s 300 largest coal power plants cause around 22,300 premature deaths each year, costing billions in disease treatment, and lost working days, and the report suggested that a further 2,700 deaths would occur each year on top of that if plans proceed to build  50 new coal plants around the continent.

Air pollution from coal plants is linked to more deaths than traffic accidents in Poland, Romania, Bulgaria, and the Czech Republic, and in Germany and the UK the figures traffic accidents only just account for more deaths than coal pollution.

The report noted that the total number of potential years of life that were lost as a result of premature deaths in 2010, was around 140,000 years. The Drax power station in Britain was responsible for the loss of 4,450 years, and the Longannet in Scotland took 4,210 years of potential life.

Related article: Shale Boom Sees Cheap US Coal Head to Europe and Asia

Coal power plants had the worst impact on health in Poland, and the most polluting utility companies in Europe were PGE (Poland), RWE (Germany & the UK), PPC (Greece), Vattenfall (Sweden, and ?EZ (Czech Republic).

Burning coal leads to microscopic particles of acid gas, soot, and dust particles, which find their way deep into the lungs and bloodstream over time; this then causes heart attacks, ling cancer, asthma, and other respiratory problems.

The report also stated that “tens of thousands of kilogrammes of toxic metals such as mercury, lead, arsenic and cadmium are spewed out of the stacks, contributing to cancer risk and harming children's development.”

By. Charles Kennedy of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News