• 5 minutes Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 11 minutes Don't Expect Too Much: Despite a Soaring Economy, America's Annual Pay Increase Isn't Budging
  • 15 minutes WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 4 hours The EU Loses The Principles On Which It Was Built
  • 4 hours Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 25 mins Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 13 hours Crude Price going to $62.50
  • 2 hours Why hydrogen economics does not work
  • 1 day Anyone Worried About the Lira Dragging EVERYTHING Else Down?
  • 9 hours WSJ *still* refuses to acknowledge U.S. Shale Oil industry's horrible economics and debts
  • 3 hours Again Google: Brazil May Probe Google Over Its Cell Phone System
  • 23 hours Chinese EV Startup Nio Files for $1.8 billion IPO
  • 1 day Oil prices---Tug of War: Sanctions vs. Trade War
  • 1 day Russia retaliate: Our Response to U.S. Sanctions Will Be Precise And Painful
  • 1 day Correlation does not equal causation, but they do tend to tango on occasion
  • 1 day Monsanto hit by $289 Million for cancerous weedkiller
Canada Frees Itself From Saudi Oil Imports

Canada Frees Itself From Saudi Oil Imports

Political differences have created a…

Zainab Calcuttawala

Zainab Calcuttawala

Zainab Calcuttawala is an American journalist based in Morocco. She completed her undergraduate coursework at the University of Texas at Austin (Hook’em) and reports on…

More Info

Indigenous Leaders Threaten Access To One Of Peru’s Largest Oilfields

Peru

Indigenous leaders in Peru will obstruct the government’s access to one of the country’s largest oilfields if an indigenous rights law does not take effect in the next 20 days, according to a new report from the Guardian.

Tribal leaders from four separate Amazon basins will collude in blocking Lima from current production areas after the government negotiated a 30-year contract with Frontera Energy to explore block 192 without consulting local indigenous people. Canadian Frontera’s current contract expires in early 2019.

A 2011 prior consultation law requires the government to seek the consent of any indigenous groups that would be affected by a prospective fossil fuel project. The energy ministry argues that a previous consultation process that began in 2015 still applies to the new contract, but the tribes insist that the previous talks were carried out in “bad faith.”

“We live in a state where our democratic rights are not respected,” Carlos Sandi of the Corrientes river indigenous federation said.  “If there is no consultation we will not allow the state or the oil companies in our territory for the next 30 years,” she added, representing one of roughly two dozen leaders from the northern Loreto region.

In July, the United Nations expressed its support for the tribes’ cause, adding concerns of uncleaned pollution in the production area.

“The Peruvian Government must suspend the direct negotiations with companies until the right to free, prior and informed consent is guaranteed, and all environmental damage has been remedied,” U.N. Special Rapporteurs Baskut Tuncak and Victoria Tauli-Corpuz said in a statement last month.

Related: Billions In Oil Deals Shield Iran From U.S. Sanctions

Block 192 produced 2,565 barrels of oil per day in 2017, far lower than the 10,000-bpd output it had in previous years.

Peru is a modest oil producer, with daily output at 38,290 bpd as of the end of 2016, but it has the third-largest gas reserves in South America, at 426.1 billion cubic meters as of 2014. Oil reserves are estimated at 170 million tons.

By Zainab Calcuttawala for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News