• 5 minutes Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 11 minutes Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 17 minutes Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 5 hours WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 3 hours Newspaper Editorials Across U.S. Rebuke Trump For Attacks On Press
  • 4 hours Mike Shellman's musings on "Cartoon of the Week"
  • 9 hours Venezuela set to raise gasoline prices to international levels.
  • 14 hours WTI @ 69.33 headed for $70s - $80s end of August
  • 1 min Permian already crested the productivity bell curve - downward now to Tier 2 geological locations
  • 3 hours Batteries Could Be a Small Dotcom-Style Bubble
  • 16 hours Renewable Energy Could "Effectively Be Free" by 2030
  • 9 hours Scottish Battery ‘Breakthrough’ Could Charge Electric Cars In Seconds
  • 15 hours Corporations Are Buying More Renewables Than Ever
  • 4 hours Don't Expect Too Much: Despite a Soaring Economy, America's Annual Pay Increase Isn't Budging
  • 20 hours Again Google: Brazil May Probe Google Over Its Cell Phone System
  • 5 hours France Will Close All Coal Fired Power Stations By 2021
Are The Saudis Involved In The Tesla Buyout Plan?

Are The Saudis Involved In The Tesla Buyout Plan?

Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund…

New Shipping Regulation Could Be A Boon For LNG

New Shipping Regulation Could Be A Boon For LNG

The International Maritime Organization’s sulfur…

In the Aftermath of Fukushima, Japan Turns to Renewable Energy

In the immediate aftermath of the 11 March nuclear catastrophe at Fukushima, which took six of Tokyo Electric Power Company’s offline, the Japanese government took immediate steps to conserve energy and urged its citizens to the do the same.

The campaign succeeded, as even with 35 of 54 nuclear reactors temporarily suspended offline for safety checks, the total electricity usage in the area covered by the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) was never more than 90 percent of the available supply, even when 20 percent less electricity was supplied this year compared to 2010 figures because of the Fukushima accident.

While Prime Minister Naoto Kan briefly flirted with the idea of eliminating nuclear energy altogether, he eventually decided upon a compromise, reducing the nation’s need for nuclear power while promoting the development of renewable energy sources such as solar and wind power to make up for the energy shortfall caused by the accident, South Korea’s JoongAng Daily reported.

A July poll by the Kyodo News Agency found that seventy percent of the Japanese public support abandoning nuclear energy, a position also supported by many local governments.
In recovering from the TEPCO tragedy, Fukushima prefecture has proposed creating a new community with renewable energy, hoping to reinvent the region as a model for the country, while Iwate prefecture is promoting the Sanriku Eco-Town Project to expand solar and wind energy generation to coastal areas.

By. Charles Kennedy, Deputy Editor OilPrice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News