• 3 minutes Could Venezuela become a net oil importer?
  • 7 minutes Reuters: OPEC Ministers Agree In Principle On 1 Million Barrels Per Day Nominal Output Increase
  • 12 minutes Battle for Oil Port: East Libya Forces In Full Control At Ras Lanuf
  • 12 hours Could Venezuela become a net oil importer?
  • 4 hours Reuters: OPEC Ministers Agree In Principle On 1 Million Barrels Per Day Nominal Output Increase
  • 15 hours Tesla Closing a Dozen Solar Facilities in Nine States
  • 21 hours Saudi Arabia plans to physically cut off Qatar by moat, nuclear waste and military base
  • 12 hours Gazprom Exports to EU Hit Record
  • 15 hours Why is permian oil "locked in" when refineries abound?
  • 5 hours Oil prices going down
  • 13 hours EU Leaders Set To Prolong Russia Sanctions Again
  • 12 hours Could oil demand collapse rapidly? Yup, sure could.
  • 12 hours Oil Buyers Club
  • 15 hours EVs Could Help Coal Demand
  • 10 hours Saudi Arabia turns to solar
  • 1 day Teapots Cut U.S. Oil Shipments
  • 21 hours China’s Plastic Waste Ban Will Leave 111 Million Tons of Trash With Nowhere To Go
  • 3 hours Russia's Energy Minister says Oil Prices Balanced at $75, so Wants to Increase OPEC + Russia Oil by 1.5 mbpd
  • 1 day Battle for Oil Port: East Libya Forces In Full Control At Ras Lanuf
Shale Shifts Attention To This ‘Forgotten’ Oil Play

Shale Shifts Attention To This ‘Forgotten’ Oil Play

As the Permian becomes overcrowded,…

Core OPEC Ramps Up Production Ahead Of Meeting

Core OPEC Ramps Up Production Ahead Of Meeting

Saudi Arabia has been one…

How Climate Change Caused the Syrian Revolution

A new study on the Arab Spring and Climate Change, finds evidence to suggest that it was not merely a coincidence that the Syrian revolution began just as the entire country was still struggling to survive after the worst drought ever recorded.

Between 2006 and 2011 nearly 60% of Syria experienced the worst drought ever, turning much of the country’s farmland into barren dust bowls, and resulting in a series of severe crop failures.

Due to the devastating drought and subsequent lack of food and water in rural areas hundreds of thousands fled to the cities, where existing problems were only exacerbated by the influx of new mouths to feed.

As water became scarcer some farmers turned to groundwater supplies to continue to grow their crops, but this then caused ground water levels around the country to plummet, compounding the effects of the drought.

Related article: Syria Chemical Attack Raises Sinister Questions

The water and food shortages then led to unrest and anger amongst the populace which eventually culminated in a revolution in 2011.

Since that time the conflict has created one million refugees, left more than 70,000 dead, and cost billions in destroyed homes, businesses, and livelihoods.

Syria is not the only country that has been badly affected by climate change.

A lack of rain in Libya led Moammar Gadhafi to develop an elaborate irrigation system to pump water from the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System, water which has been stored there since the last ice age 40,000 years ago. The problem is that Egypt, Chad, and Sudan all share the water, so as it depletes tensions are bound to rise.

By. Charles Kennedy of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News