• 8 minutes U.S. Shale Oil Debt: Deep the Denial
  • 13 minutes WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 16 minutes Trump vs. MbS
  • 1 hour Despite pressure about Khashoggi's Murder: Saudi Arabia Reassures On Oil Supply, Says Will Meet Demand
  • 6 hours Dyson Will Build Its Electric Cars in Singapore
  • 6 hours China Opens Longest Mega-Bridge Linking Hong Kong to Mainland
  • 2 hours Why I Think Natural Gas is the Logical Future of Energy
  • 38 mins Iraq war and Possible Lies
  • 18 hours Knoema: Crude Oil Price Forecast: 2018, 2019 and Long Term to 2030
  • 4 hours The Balkans Are Coming Apart at the Seams Again
  • 3 hours How Long Until We Have Working Nuclear Fusion Reactor?
  • 1 hour Satellite Moons to Replace Streetlamps?!
  • 2 hours Can “Renewables” Dent the World’s need for Electricity?
  • 5 hours These are the world’s most competitive economies: US No. 1
  • 2 hours World to Install Over One Trillion Watts of Clean Energy by 2023
  • 20 hours EU to Splash Billions on Battery Factories
Davos In The Desert Could Yield $50B In Oil & Gas Deals

Davos In The Desert Could Yield $50B In Oil & Gas Deals

According to sources interviewed by…

U.S-Saudi Clash Could Spell Disaster For OPEC

U.S-Saudi Clash Could Spell Disaster For OPEC

The Khashoggi case could have…

Gulf of Mexico Platform Explosion Caused by Hot Work

Investigations continue into the explosion that occurred on the West Delta 32 platform in the Gulf of Mexico on Friday morning.

Initial theories point to the possibility that a cutting torch ignited flammable materials aboard the platform; even John Hoffman, the COE of Black Elk (the company that owned the rig) suggested that ‘hot work’ could have led to the explosion.

Activities that involve burning or welding are called ‘hot work’, and they have been blamed for more than 60 deaths in the US over the past twenty years.

Hot work is such a dangerous activity on platforms that the federal Chemical Safety Board demands that companies monitor the air for spiking levels of flammable gas before using any tools.

Related Article: US Shale Gas Supplies won't Last Ten Years: An Interview with Bill Powers

Companies working on offshore rigs must apply welding plans for approval before any work can begin, and carry welding permits; however it is unknown whether the law requires companies to stop all hot work if gas detectors reveal dangerous levels of flammable materials in the area. Although surely common sense would suggest that action.

Accidents can often occur on platforms as a result of poor communication, and misunderstood directives. All of the casualties of the explosion were Filipino, so the possibility remains that they were unsure of the equipment instructions, or the company’s hot work policies. The insurance company FM Global also concluded from one study that the risk of fires increases on platform when outside contractors are left to work without constant supervision, and no Black Elk employees were on site at the time.

One worker was killed, several injured — two critically — and one is still missing.

By. Charles Kennedy of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News