• 4 minutes Ten Years of Plunging Solar Prices
  • 7 minutes Hydrogen Capable Natural Gas Turbines
  • 10 minutes World looks on in horror as Trump flails over pandemic despite claims US leads way
  • 13 minutes Large gas belt discovered in China
  • 38 mins COVID 19 May Be Less Deadly Than Flu Study Finds
  • 30 mins 60 mph electric mopeds
  • 46 mins The CDC confirms remarkably low coronavirus death rate. Where is the media?
  • 54 mins Monetary and Fiscal Policies in Times of Large Debt:
  • 2 hours Let’s Try This....
  • 10 hours Russia loses its chance to capture the EU gas market
  • 12 hours So the President is on that Hydroxy
  • 10 hours DEFIANCE – There are More of Us Than Them
  • 1 hour New Aussie "big batteries"
  • 16 hours Payback Time: Republican Senators turn the tables on Democrats. The difference is the Republican investigations are legit.
  • 4 hours Iran's first oil tanker has arrived near Venezuela
  • 18 hours Beware the Left's 'Degrowth' Movement (i.e. why Covid-19 is Good)
  • 15 hours China to Impose Dictatorship on Hong Kong
  • 8 hours Fed Says It Will Begin Buying Corporate-Debt ETFs on Tuesday
Germany Aims To Become World’s Hydrogen Hotspot

Germany Aims To Become World’s Hydrogen Hotspot

Germany is rapidly becoming Europe’s…

Forget the Navy's $26 a Gallon, the Air Force Paid $59 for Biofuel

The US Navy was recently lambasted by Republicans for spending $26 a gallon on biofuels during the recent RIMPAC international naval exercises; all part of its Great Green Fleet Demonstration. However little note was taken when last month the US Air Force spent $59 a gallon on biofuels to prove that alternative fuels can be used in its military aircraft; once the small price difference issue has been addressed – petrol trades at about $3.60 a gallon.

Admittedly the $639,000 the Air Force spent pales in comparison to the $12 million spent by the Navy, but the individual price per gallon is far larger. Although Keff Sheib, the vice president of Gevo, the company from whom the Air Force bought the fuel, said that the 11,000 gallons purchased were so expensive because they were from a small demonstration plant which only produces 7,500-8,000 gallons a month. Once a new, commercial sized refinery has been completed, expected to be 2015, “we believe we can be cost competitive on an all-in basis with petroleum jet fuel over the life of a contract,” he said.

By. Charles Kennedy of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage



Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News