• 5 minutes Mike Shellman's musings on "Cartoon of the Week"
  • 11 minutes Permian already crested the productivity bell curve - downward now to Tier 2 geological locations
  • 17 minutes WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 2 days The Discount Airline Model Is Coming for Europe’s Railways
  • 16 hours Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 1 day Pakistan: "Heart" Of Terrorism and Global Threat
  • 11 hours Renewable Energy Could "Effectively Be Free" by 2030
  • 4 hours Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 12 hours Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 1 day Venezuela set to raise gasoline prices to international levels.
  • 24 hours Are Trump's steel tariffs working? Seems they are!
  • 2 days WTI @ 69.33 headed for $70s - $80s end of August
  • 2 days Scottish Battery ‘Breakthrough’ Could Charge Electric Cars In Seconds
  • 4 hours China goes against US natural gas
  • 1 day Corporations Are Buying More Renewables Than Ever
  • 5 hours Why hydrogen economics does not work
Deciphering The New Caspian Agreement

Deciphering The New Caspian Agreement

The Caspian deal is a…

Oil Prices Jump As Saudis Cap Oil Supply

Oil Prices Jump As Saudis Cap Oil Supply

Oil prices rose on Tuesday…

Feeling The Oil Crunch: Saudi Arabia Cancels $266 Billion In Projects

Saudi Arabia construction

Saudi Arabia’s governing economic body called the Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has cancelled $266.7 billion in projects, the Saudi Press Agency said, and announced it would be settling much-delayed private-sector payments by year end.

The projects that have been canceled are the ones that are not expected to accelerate the kingdom’s growth or improve the living standards for its people.

The cancellations were first considered in September, but at the time, it was noted that only $20 billion in projects would be considered to put on the chopping block.

The size of the delayed payments—mainly due to severe hits to the kingdom’s oil revenue—remains undisclosed, but it includes delayed payments to construction firms, medical establishments, and foreign consultants. One analyst, according to Reuters, estimated that the amount still owing just to construction firms was US$21 billion.

The 2016 budget deficit will not be known until late December, when Saudi Arabia announces its 2017 budget plan.

Payment delays in the kingdom are nothing new. Last year in October, Saudi Arabia also experienced a delay in payments to contractors. Companies working on infrastructure projects had, in late 2015, met with payment delays that exceeded six months as the government tried to hang onto its cash as crude prices started to bite.

The measures taken by Saudi Arabia in 2015—tapping into foreign reserves, cutting spending, delaying projects, and selling bonds—seem to be reoccurring after another year of painful prices for the kingdom. And while Saudi Arabia has so far managed to tread financial water throughout the 2015 and 2016 oil price slump, many analysts feel that 2017 brings dimmer prospects to the state’s finances, despite all the efforts by OPEC members to stabilize the oil markets.

By Julianne Geiger for Oilprice.com

More Top Read From Oilprice.com:



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News