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Zainab Calcuttawala

Zainab Calcuttawala

Zainab Calcuttawala is an American journalist based in Morocco. She completed her undergraduate coursework at the University of Texas at Austin (Hook’em) and reports on…

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DAPL Protest Clean-Up Cost North Dakota $38M

Pipeline

North Dakota Governor Doug Borgum seeks federal reimbursement as a potential means of recovering the $38-million cost of policing and cleaning up after protestors who demonstrated against the Dakota Access Pipeline for months, according to a new article by Forbes.

All options are on the table,” according to Mike Nowatski, a spokesman from Borgum’s office. “The governor’s office has been in discussions with both the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and White House officials to emphasize the state’s position that federal reimbursement is warranted.

Greenpeace – one of the several environmental groups that were present at the camps and raised millions in donations from around the world at the height of protests’ media coverage – said it was not responsible for the clean-up, charging Energy Transfer Partners and the consortium of companies that built the pipeline with the job instead.

Any environmental concerns sit at the feet of the pipeline decision-makers,” group spokesperson Perry Wheeler said in an email.

Standing Rock Sioux Chairman David Archambault II, one of the main tribes that organized the dissenting movement against the $3.8 billion DAPL, expressed his condemnation of the way environmental protestors managed federal lands to VICE News.

We’re no different than the oil company, if we’re fighting for water,” Archambault said. “What’s going to happen when people leave? Who has to clean it up? Who has to refurbish it? It’s going to be us, the people who live here.”

Related: U.S. Shale Is Pushing OPEC To Breaking Point

He continued: “Before this entire movement started, that was some of the most beautiful land around. There was a place down there where eagles, over 100 eagles would come and land. There were game down there — deer, pheasants, elk, geese. Now, it’s occupied by people. And when masses of people come to one place, we don’t take care of it.”

The camps housing protestors from across the nation were located on the flood plain, meaning any waste that remains will likely be carried by the rain into the Cannonball River, contaminating local water resources as spring emerges.

By Zainab Calcuttawala for Oilprice.com

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  • Darc on March 22 2017 said:
    The $38 million is for policing costs as well as cleaning up after that bunch of irresponsible and uninformed children.
  • Chris on March 21 2017 said:
    The cleanup was done by the protesters and would have been completed had they not faced eviction deadlines. The remainder of the cleaning was done by the Army Core of engineers at the cost of 1.2 million according to their own statements. This thirty 38 million figure is an alternative fact from the oil propagandists. It largely reflects the cost of militarizing a police force to oppress the rights of the people under the united states constitution. Since the State did the bidding of the company for what the state felt was in it's own interests, it should pay for it itself. There was no need to militarize against a peaceful protest. Lumping that figure with the cost of clean up which is already being payed for at the federal level is complete nonsense. And so is this article for propagating it.
  • Bud on March 21 2017 said:
    The protesters did more environmental damage and polluted the watershed vastly more than all the pipeline crossings in the state combined in the past decade plus. Simple, sue the tribes that encouraged the protest and you will prevent this in the future since the tribes will counter sue the activists. As Mike Tyson would say, everyone is an activist until they get hit in the head with a 50 million dollar lawsuit.

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