• 2 days PDVSA Booted From Caribbean Terminal Over Unpaid Bills
  • 3 days Russia Warns Ukraine Against Recovering Oil Off The Coast Of Crimea
  • 3 days Syrian Rebels Relinquish Control Of Major Gas Field
  • 3 days Schlumberger Warns Of Moderating Investment In North America
  • 3 days Oil Prices Set For Weekly Loss As Profit Taking Trumps Mideast Tensions
  • 3 days Energy Regulators Look To Guard Grid From Cyberattacks
  • 3 days Mexico Says OPEC Has Not Approached It For Deal Extension
  • 3 days New Video Game Targets Oil Infrastructure
  • 3 days Shell Restarts Bonny Light Exports
  • 3 days Russia’s Rosneft To Take Majority In Kurdish Oil Pipeline
  • 3 days Iraq Struggles To Replace Damaged Kirkuk Equipment As Output Falls
  • 3 days British Utility Companies Brace For Major Reforms
  • 4 days Montenegro A ‘Sweet Spot’ Of Untapped Oil, Gas In The Adriatic
  • 4 days Rosneft CEO: Rising U.S. Shale A Downside Risk To Oil Prices
  • 4 days Brazil Could Invite More Bids For Unsold Pre-Salt Oil Blocks
  • 4 days OPEC/Non-OPEC Seek Consensus On Deal Before Nov Summit
  • 4 days London Stock Exchange Boss Defends Push To Win Aramco IPO
  • 4 days Rosneft Signs $400M Deal With Kurdistan
  • 4 days Kinder Morgan Warns About Trans Mountain Delays
  • 4 days India, China, U.S., Complain Of Venezuelan Crude Oil Quality Issues
  • 4 days Kurdish Kirkuk-Ceyhan Crude Oil Flows Plunge To 225,000 Bpd
  • 5 days Russia, Saudis Team Up To Boost Fracking Tech
  • 5 days Conflicting News Spurs Doubt On Aramco IPO
  • 5 days Exxon Starts Production At New Refinery In Texas
  • 5 days Iraq Asks BP To Redevelop Kirkuk Oil Fields
  • 6 days Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 6 days Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 6 days China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 6 days UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 6 days Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 6 days VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 6 days Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 6 days Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 6 days OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 7 days U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 7 days Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 7 days Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 7 days EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 7 days Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 7 days Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO
Big Oil Refuses To Give Up On The Barents Sea

Big Oil Refuses To Give Up On The Barents Sea

Despite failures in the Barents…

Can This Robot Make French Nuclear Power Plants Safer?

Can This Robot Make French Nuclear Power Plants Safer?

No, RIANA isn’t a pop star (she spells her name differently), but it could become extremely popular, especially among the nuclear energy crowd.

RIANA is the acronym for Robot for Investigations and Assessments of Nuclear Areas. Definitely not too sexy for its shirt, or any other item of clothing, but potentially valuable if you run an atomic power plant and need a mobile tool that can operate in radioactive environments to map, sample and measure radioactivity.

The robot was developed by the French energy engineering company Areva Corp. to be what the firm calls the “Swiss army knife of nuclear robotics.” It’s basically a mechanized platform that can shoulder interchangeable devices, some of which measure radioactive material, some of which merely sample it to map “hot” areas.

Related: The Coming Financial Apocalypse For U.S. Shale

RIANA can be equipped either with four-wheel propulsion or with caterpillar tracks. Built in are three-dimensional and thermal cameras so that it can illustrate its environment immediately to its human controllers. It even has lasers that detect and help it avoid obstacles, and also help it situate itself accurately in tight spaces.

And most important, it’s not just a work in progress, it’s ready to use. Areva says the first model of RIANA has been delivered to France’s Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). The AEC says it is so impressed that it’s already ordered a second model with even more features, and some nuclear power plant operators have expressed interest in buying the robot.

Related: Oil Production Vital Statistics July 2015 – Equilibrium Reached

RIANA’s talents have been in development for three years. In 2012, Areva chose Energid Technologies Corp. of Cambridge, Mass., to adapt its robotic operating system, called Actin, to the French machine. The software originally was developed for NASA to simplify the interface between space robots and their human controllers.

The robot’s Human-Machine Interface, as it is called, is derived from a technology that allows RIANA’s controllers to intervene while the device is in the middle of a chore. In fact, Areva says RIANA’s work “can be executed without necessarily requiring the presence of an operator – an optional guidance program allows the robot to find its own way and to work on a site autonomously.”

Related: Current Oil Price Slump Far From Over

Even a break in communications won’t scrub a mission, according to Areva. In that case, the robot can be guided autonomously back to its last known location, just as if it were being directed by a human operator.

Thierry Varet, the technical director of Areva’s Dismantling & Services department, said RIANA would be well-suited for dismantling nuclear operations, especially in cases where radiation levels are dangerous for humans.

In sum, Varet says, “AREVA has extensive experience in the development of this type of technology and offers a broad catalog of complementary robotic devices that are designed to work together.”

By Andy Tully Of Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News