• 3 minutes Oil Price Could Fall To $30 If Global Deal Not Extended
  • 8 minutes Why Is America (Texas) Burning Millions of Dollars Per Day Of Natural Gas?
  • 11 minutes Is $60/Bbl WTI still considered a break even for Shale Oil
  • 15 minutes CNN:America's oil boom will break more records this year. OPEC is stuck in retreat
  • 9 mins The Pope: "Climate change ... doomsday predictions can no longer be met with irony or disdain."
  • 13 hours Hormuz and surrounding waters: Energy Threats to the World: Oil, LNG, shipping markets digest new risks after Strait of Hormuz attack
  • 17 hours As Iran Nuclear Deal Flounders, France Turns To Saudi For Oil
  • 12 hours The Magic and Wonders of US Shale Supply: Keeping energy price shock minimised: US oil supply keeping lid on prices despite global risks: IEA chief
  • 22 hours Middle East on brink: Oil tankers attacked off Oman
  • 16 hours Never Knew Gasoline Prices were this important!
  • 14 hours (Un)expectedly: UK Court Sets Assange U.S. Extradition Hearing For February 2020
  • 13 hours Russia removes special military forces from Venezuela . . . . Maduro gone by September ? . . . Oil starts to flow ? Think so . .
  • 1 day Middle East Attack Jolts Oil-Import Dependent Asia
  • 1 day Magic of Shale: EXPORTS!! Crude Exporters Navigate Gulf Coast Terminal Constraints
  • 4 hours Plants are Dying
  • 10 hours We Are Better Than This
  • 1 day Emmissions up, renewables nowhere

Batteries May Replace Some Power Plants

Batteries can be an expensive way to provide power to utility customers, but new research shows they can be an effective way to generate power during high demand for electricity – if their cost continues to fall.

That’s the conclusion of battery company executives who spoke at the Utility of the Future conference in Washington on June 2-4. The sweet spot, they said, is when the price of energy storage can be brought below $300 per kilowatt-hour.

Steve Hellmann, president of Eos Energy Storage, told the conference that as costs continue to come down and the value of battery storage of electricity continues to rise, “there’s no turning back.” In fact, he said, so-called “peaker plants,” designed to handle surges in power demand, will become obsolete within five years.

Peaker plants are expensive and inefficient because they’re used only at peak demand. Batteries, though, can be used much more often, such as to maintain a steady flow of electricity by balancing the supply and demand in the grid.

Related Article: How Food Can Build Better Lithium Batteries

For example, Chris Shelton, president of AES Energy Storage, says AES already has installed huge lithium-ion batteries totaling 174 megawatts. This includes a 32-megawatt unit linked to a wind farm that, among other things, helps keep a steady supply of electricity from wind turbines.

These technologies could turn utility practices upside down. Arizona State University (ASU), for example, has been holding workshops on alternative energy, the aim of which isn’t necessarily to threaten existing utilities, but to provide a roadmap for them to follow to operate profitably as energy sources change.

By Andy Tully of OIlprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News