• 6 minutes Saudis Threaten Retaliation If Sanctions are Imposed
  • 11 minutes Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
  • 15 minutes Saudis Pull Hyperloop Funding As Branson Temporarily Cuts Ties With The Kingdom
  • 33 mins WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 2 hours Trump vs. MbS
  • 22 mins Saudi-Kuwaiti Talks on Shared Oil Stall Over Chevron
  • 4 hours The Dirt on Clean Electric Cars
  • 2 hours Closing the circle around Saudi Arabia: Where did Khashoggi disappear?
  • 11 hours Uber IPO Proposals Value Company at $120 Billion
  • 18 hours UN Report Suggests USD $240 Per Gallon Gasoline Tax to Fight Global Warming
  • 16 mins EU to Splash Billions on Battery Factories
  • 15 hours COLORADO FOCUS: Stocks to Watch Prior to Midterms
  • 5 hours Coal remains a major source of power in Europe.
  • 2 hours Poland signs 20-year deal on U.S. LNG supplies
  • 12 hours U.N. About Climate Change: World Must Take 'Unprecedented' Steps To Avert Worst Effects
  • 14 hours Nopec Sherman act legislation
Oil Price Rally Revives Offshore Oil Sector

Oil Price Rally Revives Offshore Oil Sector

The offshore sector was one…

Why Is This Little-Known Element Up Over 300%

Why Is This Little-Known Element Up Over 300%

Scalable sustainable energy storage has…

A First: U.S. Special Ops On-Ground in Libya

US spec ops

For the first time, elite U.S. Special Operations troops are directly helping fighters combat against ISIS in Libya with on-site support, The Washington Post reported on Tuesday, citing U.S. and Libyan officials.

A small group of U.S. Special Operations forces are operating together with UK troops in Sirte, a city on the Libyan coast and ISIS’ de facto capital in North Africa. The role of the U.S. troops is limited to backing forces loyal to Libya’s unity Government of National Accord (GNA), The Post noted, quoting U.S. officials who spoke on condition of anonymity.

Last week, the U.S. launched precision air strikes against targets of ISIS in its stronghold Sirte in order to back the efforts of GNA-affiliated troops to defeat ISIS in the city.

The U.S. strikes have hit nearly 30 militant targets so far, according to The Post.

While Western forces step up their support for fighters against ISIS in Libya, the country continues to be torn by militant attacks at or close to oil infrastructure. In the latest incident, gunmen from the Benghazi Defense Brigades attacked on Tuesday members of the Libyan National Army (LNA) who were guarding the Naga oilfield, local media reported. The insurgents were forced to withdraw after six hours of clashes in which six militants and two army members were killed. In May, the LNA took over the oilfield which is not currently active.

Just last week, another Libyan militia, Operation Dignity, attacked the Zueitina oil terminal near Benghazi. The attack was repelled by Petroleum Facilities Guard forces, which are another militia operating in the country. Depending on sources, the Operation Dignity move was seen either as an attack on oil facilities or as an attempt to secure their reopening as agreed by one of the chiefs of the PFG, Ibrahim Jahdran, and the Presidential Council. The agreement followed years of PFG-led blockades of Libya’s four major oil export terminals, which have a combined capacity of 860,000 bpd.

All that militant activity, however, indicates that the likelihood of Libya’s oil output rising by 600,000 bpd, as Libya’s National Oil Corporation (NOC) said last week, is still far from a certainty.

By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:


x

Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News