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Darrell Delamaide

Darrell Delamaide

Darrell Delamaide is a writer, editor and journalist with more than 30 years' experience. He is the author of three books and has written for…

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New U.S. Study Triples Estimate of Nation's Wind Power Potential

Wind power potential in the United States is more than triple what was originally thought, according to new estimates from the U.S. Department of Energy, as improved technology makes this renewable energy source more accessible.

A new study released last week, the first since 1993, estimated that onshore U.S. wind resources could generate nearly 37,000,000 gigawatt hours (GWh) annually, more than nine times current total U.S. electricity consumption. The previous government survey of wind resources estimated U.S. wind potential at 10,777,000 GWh.

“This new analysis confirms that America is blessed with vast wind resources that can energize our economy, create jobs, and avoid carbon for years to come,” American Wind Energy Association chief executive Denise Bode said.

The new assessment from the DOE’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory in collaboration with AWS Truewind of Albany, N.Y., measured wind at higher distances – 80 meters – and used more refined measuring techniques. Advances in wind turbine technology have expanded the potential wind use in higher elevations.

The new estimates also realigned the ranking of states for wind energy potential, making Texas No. 1 and relegating the previous top state, North Dakota, to sixth position. Texas is also the leader in wind energy production, with Iowa, now No. 7 in wind potential, ranking second in production.

The top 10 states in the new ranking are:

1.  Texas
2. Kansas
3. Montana
4. Nebraska
5. South Dakota
6. North Dakota
7. Iowa
8. Wyoming
9. Oklahoma
10. New Mexico

Indiana, Ohio and Oregon move into the top 20 for wind energy potential for the first time.

The potential capacity of America’s onshore wind resource is over 10,000 gigawatts (GW), AWEA noted. Even though the U.S. wind industry added nearly 10 GW of new capacity in 2009 – enough to power 2.4 million homes or generate as much electricity as three large nuclear power plants – the current wind installed capacity is just 35 GW in the U.S., and just 158 GW worldwide.

“The wind resource is there, vast and inexhaustible, waiting for us,” Bode said, urging Congress to mandate wind energy targets. “A national Renewable Electricity Standard would not only ensure that we tap our nation’s vast wind resources, but create thousands of new American jobs today, manufacturing the 8,000 component parts that go into a modern wind turbine.”

By Darrell Delamaide




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  • Anonymous on February 23 2010 said:
    I was surprised to see my home state of Arizona not in the top ten. The northern half of the state blows hard. Of course the readings were probably taken at the Phoenix airport. ;-]

    Ray @ New World Solar
    http://newworldsolarpower.com
  • Anonymous on February 23 2010 said:
    Interesting. The other day somebody asked me to do some research on ethanol, suggesting that I start by "following the money". I declined, because I do not want to lose my faith in humanity. The same thing is true here. I just finished making some calculations on wind turbines in the North Sea, and I really wonder if it is true that, being citizens of perhaps the richest country in the world, some Norwegians have decided to go on a vodka diet.

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