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Is The U.S. Solar Boom In Jeopardy?

The Trump administration is weighing…

Advances in Fullerene Technology Boosts Organic Solar Cell Efficiency

Advances in Fullerene Technology Boosts Organic Solar Cell Efficiency

An insight into the properties of fullerene could lead to a new class of electronic acceptors for better and cheaper organic solar cells, report researchers.

Organic solar cells have advanced a great deal since they were first invented nearly 20 years ago, but the fullerene component has remained largely the same and this has had a braking effect on the technology’s evolution.

But now scientists have pinpointed an unappreciated property of fullerenes, namely the availability of additional electron accepting states, which could be replicated to create a new class of “fullerene mimics.”

Their research is described in a new study in the journal Advanced Materials.

Related Article: Is the US in the Middle of a Solar Boom?

The solar cell industry has been searching for an alternative to fullerenes for some time as they have many drawbacks as electronic acceptors, including a very limited light adsorption and a high cost.
Also, going beyond fullerene derivatives would increase the possible blends that can be considered for organic solar cells.

Led by Professor Alessandro Troisi in the department of chemistry, University of Warwick scientists have discovered that fullerene can accept electrons in a number of excited states, not just in its ground anionic state.

These extra states make the process of electron capture faster and improve the efficiency of the charge separation process.

This particular property is not possessed by chance—it needs to be designed into a material and so any attempt to make a fullerene substitute needs to take this property into account. Troisi believes this is why several attempts to date by the industry to find a replacement have failed.

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However the scientists have shown that a new class of molecular acceptors with this electronic characteristic can be designed relatively easily, providing a route towards replacing fullerene derivatives in solar cells.

“Finding a replacement to fullerene has eluded the scientific community and the photovoltaics industry for the best part of two decades,” says Troisi. “By pinpointing this particular way in which fullerene behaves, we believe we have found a key which may unlock the door to new replacements for this material.

“Using this knowledge, we are now collaborating with experimentalists at University of Warwick to actively develop fullerene substitutes.”

A patent application has been filed and the scientists are keen to work with commercial partners to bring this technology to market.

The European Research Council funded the study.

By. Anna Blackaby




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