• 30 mins Syrian Rebels Relinquish Control Of Major Gas Field
  • 2 hours Schlumberger Warns Of Moderating Investment In North America
  • 3 hours Oil Prices Set For Weekly Loss As Profit Taking Trumps Mideast Tensions
  • 4 hours Energy Regulators Look To Guard Grid From Cyberattacks
  • 5 hours Mexico Says OPEC Has Not Approached It For Deal Extension
  • 7 hours New Video Game Targets Oil Infrastructure
  • 8 hours Shell Restarts Bonny Light Exports
  • 9 hours Russia’s Rosneft To Take Majority In Kurdish Oil Pipeline
  • 16 hours Iraq Struggles To Replace Damaged Kirkuk Equipment As Output Falls
  • 21 hours British Utility Companies Brace For Major Reforms
  • 1 day Montenegro A ‘Sweet Spot’ Of Untapped Oil, Gas In The Adriatic
  • 1 day Rosneft CEO: Rising U.S. Shale A Downside Risk To Oil Prices
  • 1 day Brazil Could Invite More Bids For Unsold Pre-Salt Oil Blocks
  • 1 day OPEC/Non-OPEC Seek Consensus On Deal Before Nov Summit
  • 1 day London Stock Exchange Boss Defends Push To Win Aramco IPO
  • 1 day Rosneft Signs $400M Deal With Kurdistan
  • 1 day Kinder Morgan Warns About Trans Mountain Delays
  • 2 days India, China, U.S., Complain Of Venezuelan Crude Oil Quality Issues
  • 2 days Kurdish Kirkuk-Ceyhan Crude Oil Flows Plunge To 225,000 Bpd
  • 2 days Russia, Saudis Team Up To Boost Fracking Tech
  • 2 days Conflicting News Spurs Doubt On Aramco IPO
  • 2 days Exxon Starts Production At New Refinery In Texas
  • 2 days Iraq Asks BP To Redevelop Kirkuk Oil Fields
  • 3 days Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 3 days Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 3 days China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 3 days UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 3 days Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 3 days VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 3 days Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 3 days Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 3 days OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 4 days U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 4 days Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 4 days Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 4 days EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 4 days Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 4 days Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO
  • 7 days Trump Passes Iran Nuclear Deal Back to Congress
  • 7 days Texas Shutters More Coal-Fired Plants
Alt Text

Is Hydrogen Fuel As Dumb As Musk Thinks?

Hydrogen fuel cells have been…

Alt Text

Can India Overtake China In The EV Revolution?

India wants to drastically increase…

Sweden Looks to Import Garbage for Energy

Sweden Looks to Import Garbage for Energy

What happens when you’re a small country—like Sweden—and you want to generate power by converting waste? You have to look beyond your own borders for garbage.

Sweden, population 9.5 million, is doing just that in order to feed an ambitious waste-to-energy program.

Statistics show that each person in Sweden produces about a half ton of household waste every year.  Only about 4% of this waste ends up in landfills, the rest already put to use producing energy.

By way of comparison, it makes the US—where half of all garbage ends up in landfills—look rather inefficient.

Related article: Turn Your Leftovers into Energy

Sweden burns garbage to generate an impressive 20% of its heating needs through a system that distributes heat by pumping heated water into pipes through residential and commercial buildings.

Every year, just over two million tons of household waste—and a similar volume of industrial waste--is treated in Sweden’s waste-to-energy plants.  Waste incineration provides heat to about 810,000 homes and electricity to 250,000 homes.

It’s so efficient, in fact, that’s there’s not enough waste to go around.

According to the country’s Environmental Protection Agency, Sweden needs more trash to feed its energy habit, and has already begun important garbage from its neighbors. For starters, Sweden has so far imported over 881,000 tons of trash from Norway.

Soon there should be more garbage available for Sweden, as the European Union seeks to reduce the amount of rubbish dumped in landfills—a figure that sits at about 150 million tons annually.

Related article: Dead Bodies for Renewable Energy?

Senior Swedish EPA advisor Catarina Ostlund told reporters that while Sweden has more capacity for waste-to-energy than it does actual waste, Norway may not be the ideal partner a trash import-export scheme because it is in turn importing rubbish itself. Instead, it’s newer EU members that Sweden should be eyeing.

“I hope that we instead will get the waste from Italy or from Romania or Bulgaria or the Baltic countries because they landfill a lot in these countries. They don’t have any incineration plants or recycling plants, so they need to find a solution for their waste."

Other European countries such as Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands are following Sweden’s example with new waste-to-energy initiatives.

By. Charles Kennedy of Oilprice.com




Back to homepage


Leave a comment

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News