• 4 minutes Energy Armageddon
  • 6 minutes "How to Calculate Your Individual ESG Score to ensure that your Digital ID 'benefits' and money are accessible"
  • 12 minutes "Europe’s Energy Crisis Has Ended Its Era Of Abundance" by Irina Slav
  • 16 hours GREEN NEW DEAL = BLIZZARD OF LIES
  • 1 day Is Europe heading for winter of discontent with extensive gas shortages?
  • 16 hours "False Flag Planted In Nord Stream Pipeline, GFANZ, Gore, Carney, Net Zero, U.S. Banks, Fake Meat, and more" - NEWS in 28 minutes
  • 7 days Wind droughts
  • 1 day ""Green" Energy Is a Scam. It Isn't MEANT to Work." - By James Corbett of The Corbett Report
  • 24 hours "Natural Gas Price Fundamental Daily Forecast – Grinding Toward Summer Highs Despite Huge Short Interest" by James Hyerczyk & REUTERS on NatGas
  • 4 days Kazakhstan Is Defying Russia and Has the Support of China. China is Using Russia's Weakness to Expand Its Own Influence.
  • 3 days Xi Is Set To Be Re-Elected As China’s Leader
  • 8 days Oil Prices Fall After Fed Raises Rates
  • 10 days Oil Stocks, Market Direction, Bitcoin, Minerals, Gold, Silver - Technical Trading <--- Chris Vermeulen & Gareth Soloway weigh in
  • 4 days 87,000 new IRS agents, higher taxes, and a massive green energy slush fund... "Here Are The Winners And Losers In The 'Inflation Reduction Act'"-ZeroHedge
  • 13 days Beware the Left's 'Degrowth' Movement (i.e. why Covid-19 is Good)
What Are Climate Bonds?

What Are Climate Bonds?

Green bonds, or climate bonds,…

Futurity

Futurity

Futurity covers research news from the top universities in the US, UK, Canada and Australia

More Info

Premium Content

Obama Faces a Tough Task to Put a Million EVs on the Road by 2015

The Obama administration’s goal of putting a million plug-in electric vehicles on the roads by 2015 may be a tough sell, say researchers.

But, the new study does find that consumers are more receptive to buying electric cars in some cities, including San Jose/San Francisco, Chicago, and Boston.

Researchers surveyed more than 2,300 adult drivers in 21 large US cities in the fall of 2011. They found that the perceived drawbacks of electric vehicles outweigh the advantages for most consumers.

The primary drawbacks are the limited driving range, the vehicles’ high sales or lease price, and the inconvenience of recharging batteries.

“Although many engineers, environmentalists, and politicians are enthusiastic about electric vehicle technology, this survey reveals that new car buyers, based on early impressions, have little interest in purchasing plug-in vehicles,” says John D. Graham, dean of the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University and a co-author of the study.

While plug-in electric vehicles provide considerable fuel savings, those weren’t enough to offset the perceived disadvantages, report the researchers, whose findings appear in Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment.

Graham says new-car buyers typically keep their vehicles only three to five years, not long enough for fuel savings to make up for the premium purchase price.

Car buyers also typically do not consider the costs of operation and upkeep but tend to focus more heavily instead on the sticker price of the car.

Related Article: New Charging Algorithm can Extend Battery Life for Electric Vehicles

The ‘pioneers’

The survey found the early adopters who are likely to buy plug-in electric vehicles are predominantly highly educated, male, concerned about the environment, and worried about American dependence on foreign oil. They are also more likely to have previously owned a hybrid vehicle.

“Those interested in electric vehicles at this time are attracted to the environmental imaging associated with electric vehicles and are typically technology pioneers,” says lead author Sanya Carley, assistant professor in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

“It’s helpful to know this information, because it can help manufacturers identify their early car-buying population, and it also reveals which consumer types are not being reached by current marketing campaigns.”

The challenge for manufacturers, is to figure out how to market the vehicles to mainstream car buyers, not just the early adopters. This may require providing more information about fuel savings as well as addressing concerns about driving range, price and convenience.

How far will it go?

Concerns about plug-in electric vehicles’ limited driving range, so-called “range anxiety,” helps explain another finding: Consumers are somewhat more interested in buying hybrid electric vehicles, with a gasoline-powered backup engine, than electric-only vehicles.

This suggests there may be better market potential for hybrids like the Chevy Volt, Toyota Plug-In Prius, and Ford C-Max Energi Plug-In.

Graham says vehicle manufacturers and suppliers are making progress in addressing the negatives associated with electric vehicles. Prices have come down for the Volt and the Nissan Leaf, and lease arrangements have been made more attractive.

Second-generation plug-in vehicles are expected to have shorter charging times and the capacity to be driven farther without re-charging.

Related Article: Improved Charging Technology Vital for Progress of EV Market

Building more charging stations and concentrating them in areas where they can be easily seen could also help alleviate worries that an electric vehicle would leave drivers stuck with a run-down battery.

Realistic expectations

“Policy makers also need to develop more realistic expectations about the pace of market acceptance of plug-in technology,” Graham says, “and they may need to retain policy incentives for plug-in vehicle purchases longer than they originally anticipated would be necessary.”

For example, President Barack Obama has proposed increasing the federal income tax credit for buying a plug-in vehicle and making it effective at the time of purchase rather than the end of the tax year.

One of the more interesting findings in the study was the city-by-city variation in intent to purchase an electric vehicle, suggesting car companies might target their sales and marketing efforts.

The interest of survey respondents in buying a plug-in electric vehicle was rated on a 10-point scale; the average score was 2.67.

Cities with the highest intent-to-purchase ratings were: San Jose/San Francisco, with a score of 3.72; Chicago, 3.25; and Boston, 3.03. Cities with the lowest ratings were: Dallas/Fort Worth, 2.17; San Antonio, 2.21; and Indianapolis, 2.21.

By. Steve Hinnefield


Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage





Leave a comment
  • Sue on January 26 2013 said:
    How safe are Electric Vehicles? If cell phones are harmful then what can one say about traveling in the field(s) in an electric car? I wonder and ponder EM exposure.

Leave a comment




EXXON Mobil -0.35
Open57.81 Trading Vol.6.96M Previous Vol.241.7B
BUY 57.15
Sell 57.00
Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News