• 2 days Iraq Begins To Rebuild Largest Refinery
  • 2 days Canadian Producers Struggle To Find Transport Oil Cargo
  • 3 days Venezuela’s PDVSA Makes $539M Interest Payments On Bonds
  • 3 days China's CNPC Considers Taking Over South Pars Gas Field
  • 3 days BP To Invest $200 Million In Solar
  • 3 days Tesla Opens New Showroom In NYC
  • 3 days Petrobras CEO Hints At New Partner In Oil-Rich Campos Basin
  • 3 days Venezuela Sells Oil Refinery Stake To Cuba
  • 3 days Tesla Is “Headed For A Brick Wall”
  • 3 days Norwegian Pension Fund Set to Divest From Oil Sands and Coal Ventures
  • 3 days IEA: “2018 Might Not Be Quite So Happy For OPEC Producers”
  • 3 days Goldman Bullish On Oil Markets
  • 4 days OPEC Member Nigeria To Issue Africa’s First Sovereign Green Bond
  • 4 days Nigeria To Spend $1B Of Oil Money Fighting Boko Haram
  • 4 days Syria Aims To Begin Offshore Gas Exploration In 2019
  • 4 days Australian Watchdog Blocks BP Fuel Station Acquisition
  • 4 days Colombia Boosts Oil & Gas Investment
  • 4 days Environmentalists Rev Up Anti-Keystone XL Angst Amongst Landowners
  • 4 days Venezuelan Default Swap Bonds At 19.25 Cents On The Dollar
  • 5 days Aramco On The Hunt For IPO Global Coordinators
  • 5 days ADNOC Distribution Jumps 16% At Market Debut In UAE
  • 5 days India Feels the Pinch As Oil Prices Rise
  • 5 days Aramco Announces $40 Billion Investment Program
  • 5 days Top Insurer Axa To Exit Oil Sands
  • 6 days API Reports Huge Crude Draw
  • 6 days Venezuela “Can’t Even Write A Check For $21.5M Dollars.”
  • 6 days EIA Lowers 2018 Oil Demand Growth Estimates By 40,000 Bpd
  • 6 days Trump Set To Open Atlantic Coast To Oil, Gas Drilling
  • 6 days Norway’s Oil And Gas Investment To Drop For Fourth Consecutive Year
  • 6 days Saudis Plan To Hike Gasoline Prices By 80% In January
  • 6 days Exxon To Start Reporting On Climate Change Effect
  • 6 days US Geological Survey To Reevaluate Bakken Oil Reserves
  • 6 days Brazil Cuts Local Content Requirements to Attract Oil Investors
  • 7 days Forties Pipeline Could Remain Shuttered For Weeks
  • 7 days Desjardins Ends Energy Loan Moratorium
  • 7 days ADNOC Distribution IPO Valuation Could Be Lesson For Aramco
  • 7 days Russia May Turn To Cryptocurrencies For Oil Trade
  • 7 days Iraq-Iran Oil Swap Deal To Run For 1 Year
  • 9 days Venezuelan Crude Exports To U.S. Fall To 15-year Lows
  • 9 days Mexico Blames Brazil For Failing Auction

Breaking News:

Iraq Begins To Rebuild Largest Refinery

Alt Text

China Launches World’s First All-Electric Cargo Ship

A Chinese shipbuilder has just…

Alt Text

The Secret To Replacing Fossil Fuels

Renewable skeptics cite low efficiency,…

Alt Text

The Stunning Energy Cost Of Tesla’s Semi-Truck

Tesla’s electric trucks could require…

Daniel J. Graeber

Daniel J. Graeber

Daniel Graeber is a writer and political analyst based in Michigan. His work on matters related to the geopolitical aspects of the global energy sector,…

More Info

Green Energy is About Green Backs

Green Energy is About Green Backs

While most major economies agree that some form of alternative and renewable resources are needed as part of the emerging energy mix, embracing frontier areas like wave arrays might be more about changing the way decision-makers think about energy than simply about the saving the environment. That's how Richard Yemm, founder of Scottish company Pelamis Wave Power, sees it anyhow. He says efforts underway in Europe aren't just about protecting the environment, they're about new ways to provide energy that make economic sense. He's not, after all, just talking about climate change when he talks about going green.

"The second industrial revolution is well under way in the U.K. and Europe, one which is based on green energy and technology," says Yemm, "and Scotland, which aims to decarbonize its economy, is leading the way in frontier energy developments."

The first industrial revolution was driven by carbon-based energy resources and helped define today's economy, he explained. The second revolution is driven by green technologies. This sector is already big business in Europe and, if First Minister Alex Salmond gets his way, it will help an independent Scotland stand alone in the region.

On the west coast of Scotland, powerful ocean swells roll into shore year round. Because of this, Yemm claims there's enough wave energy to power 100 homes with every step you take along the beach.

"The ocean is like a gigantic battery," he says, "continually being charged by the wind."

Wave power is more reliable and predictable than wind or solar because it's less dependent on the local weather conditions. The waves are always rolling, said Yemm.

Scotland and the rest of the European community understand the risks and opportunities presented by frontier renewable energy technologies like wave power. Several energy companies are already testing his company's Pelamis wave-energy converters and there could be enough of them in the water to generate as much as 200 megawatts of electricity from the waters of Scotland's west coast by the end of the decade. That's not much, says Yemm, but it's a good start for a new energy source that's expected to bring in significant revenue for all players involved, including those outside Europe.

So why is Scotland the model rather than the norm? Yemm says it’s a matter of making alternative energy something more than just an environmental issue. It needs to be something that's on equal footing with the rest of the energy sector. The wind, the sun's rays and waves are just as much a source of energy as oil and natural gas, Yemm explains. It took hundreds of years of technological development to make oil and natural gas inexpensive, though the IEA said the age of cheap conventional energy is likely over.

For most of the rest of the world, the climate change and alternative energy debate isn't at the top of the agenda, however. The United States and Canada, two oil-rich countries in their own right, backed out of the Kyoto Protocol saying, for all intents and purposes, it was an ineffective environmental treaty.  But major economies like the United States can push ahead with alternative energy if they decide to put their money where their mouth is in the green energy debate, says Yemm. It just requires a paradigm shift in the way countries look at their available natural resources.  It's not, he says, just about environmental stewardship. It's about making a buck along the way too.

"Europe has set targets to decarbonize its economy in a fraction of the time it has taken to create the carbon-based economy," he said. "However, contrary to the common view, it is not looking on this as a noble duty or an unavoidable burden, but as an economic opportunity on a grander scale than the first industrial revolution that created the requirement for it."

By. Daniel J. Graeber of Oilprice.com




Back to homepage


Leave a comment

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News