• 4 minutes Pompeo: Aramco Attacks Are An "Act Of War" By Iran
  • 7 minutes Who Really Benefits From The "Iran Attacked Saudi Arabia" Narrative?
  • 11 minutes Trump Will Win In 2020
  • 15 minutes Experts review Saudi damage photos. Say Said is need to do a lot of explaining.
  • 2 hours Ethanol, the Perfect Home Remedy for A Saudi Oil Fever
  • 6 hours Hong Kong protesters appeal to Trump for support.
  • 16 hours Europe: The Cracks Are Beginning To Show
  • 4 hours Memorize date 05/15/2018 cause Huawei ban is the most important single event in world history after 9/11/2001.
  • 18 hours Iran Vows Major War Even If US Conducts "Limited Strikes"
  • 4 hours Millennials: A boil on the butt of the work ethic
  • 5 hours A little something for all you Offshore swabbies
  • 13 hours Ban Fracking? What in the World Are Democrats Thinking?
  • 32 mins LA Times: Vote Trump out in 2020 to Prevent Climate Apocalypse
  • 20 mins When Trying To Be Objective About Ethanol, Don't Include Big Oil Lies To Balance The Argument
  • 3 hours Saudi State-of-Art Defense System looking the wrong way. MBS must fire Defense Minister. Oh, MBS is Defense Minister. Forget about it.
  • 3 hours Shale profitability
  • 6 hours US and China are already in a full economic war and this battle for global hegemony is a little bit frightening
  • 1 day Yawn... Parliament Poised to Force Brexit Delay Until Jan. 31
  • 13 hours Let's shut down dissent like The Conversation in Australia
Alt Text

Can The U.S. Keep Its Nuclear Industry Afloat?

The United States is severely…

Alt Text

Nuclear Is Not A Catch-All Solution To Climate Change

Though many pundits and analysts…

Alt Text

China Aims For Nuclear Dominance

China’s revival and rise to…

SciDev SciDev

SciDev SciDev

SciDev.Net – the Science and Development Network – is a not-for-profit organisation dedicated to providing reliable and authoritative information about science and technology for the…

More Info

Premium Content

Pakistan Chooses Nuclear Energy over Climate Change in New Budget

Pakistan's 44 per cent hike in outlay for atomic energy in its 2012–2013 budget contrasts with a massive drop in funds for crop research and overshadows a much smaller hike in overall allocation for science.  

Despite drawing international attention in the past two years to its increased vulnerability to climate change, Pakistan allocated a meagre 135 million Pakistani rupees (US$ 1.43 million) to its newly formed climate change ministry – a fraction of the US$ 416 million given to the atomic energy sector in the budget presented on 1 June.

Chaudhry Qamar uz Zaman, meteorologist and architect of the country's national climate change policy that was approved by cabinet in March, described as "dismal" the allocation for the climate ministry.

"Such low budgetary allocations reflect the insensitivity of the budget planners towards climate change issues the country is grappling with," he toldSciDev.Net. Pakistan’s ministry of science and technology, which oversees 16 research and development institutes, received a 12.58 per cent raise, up from US$ 12.19 million in the previous year to US$ 13.94 million.

Agriculture research has received a paltry US$ 5.26 million to boost overall output of the crop, livestock, horticulture, fisheries and dairy sectors. This is a 90 per cent drop from US$ 54.26 million in last year's budget, mainly due to the devolution of the original agriculture ministry into provincial ministries in 2011.

The relatively low 13 per cent hike in the science and technology ministry’s funds has left science minister Mir Changez Khan Jamali unhappy.

"We had demanded over US1.07 billion dollars (one per cent of the GDP) in budgetary funds for S&T promotion, but with the paltry allocations it is going to be hard for us to achieve advancement in research, S&T fields," the minister told SciDev.Net.

Jamali said low funds have led to poor performance by several key sectors such as science, agriculture, water resources, environment, renewable energy and industry. Space science, which comes under ministry of defence, got US$ 7.62 million – down by 66.7 per cent against receipts in 2011–2012.

Nadeem-ul-Haq, chairman of the Planning Commission of Pakistan, toldSciDev.Net that the budget had a 33.3 per cent deficit and allocations were made after taking into account tight monetary conditions in the country.

Pakistan's science, technology and innovation policy, approved in September 2011, had sought two per cent of the country’s GDP to be spent on science sectors by 2020 against the 0.59 per cent being spent at present.

By. Saleem Shaikh

Source: SciDev




Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage



Leave a comment

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News
Download on the App Store Get it on Google Play