• 4 minutes England Running Out of Water?
  • 7 minutes Trump to Make Allies Pay More to Host US Bases
  • 10 minutes U.S. Shale Output may Start Dropping Next Year
  • 14 minutes Washington Eyes Crackdown On OPEC
  • 10 mins The Political Debacle: Brexit delayed
  • 2 hours No Mercy: EU Fines Google $1.7 billion For Abusing Online Ads Market
  • 38 mins New Rebate For EVs in Canada
  • 4 hours Trump sells out his base to please Wallstreet and Oil industry
  • 3 hours 3 Pipes: EPIC 900K, CACTUS II 670K, GREY OAKS 800K
  • 11 hours Tidal Power Closer to Commercialisation
  • 12 hours Solar to Become World's Largest Power Source by 2050
  • 19 hours Oil-sands recovery by solvents has started on a trial basis; first loads now shipped.
  • 2 hours Biomass, Ethanol No Longer Green
  • 13 hours Read: OPEC THREATENED TO KILL US SHALE
  • 12 hours Will Trump Cave Again
  • 18 hours Oil stocks are heating up again! What's on your Watchlist?
  • 18 hours Boeing Faces Safety Questions After Second 737 Crash In Five Months
Alt Text

Can The U.S. Keep Its Nuclear Industry Afloat?

The United States is severely…

Alt Text

Is Uranium On The Way Back?

Kazakhstan’s state-owned uranium miner has…

Alt Text

U.S. Nuclear Has A Tough Road Ahead

High-profile disasters and a booming…

David Gabel

David Gabel

David is a writer at Environmental News Network

More Info

Trending Discussions

Belgium to Shut Down All Nuclear Reactors by 2025

The small western-European country of Belgium currently has two commercial nuclear sites and a total of seven reactors. Nuclear energy accounts for over half of the nation's power consumption, a total of about 45 billion kilowatt-hours per year. Although typically quite fractured, Belgium's political parties have reached a consensus on nuclear power. The oldest reactors are to be shut down by 2015 and all nuclear reactors at both sites will be shut down by 2025. The plan is conditional on Belgium finding enough energy from alternative sources to prevent power shortages.

The two Belgian nuclear sites are located at opposite ends of the country. Doel Nuclear Power Station is on the northwest side near the port of Antwerp. The Tihange Nuclear Power Station is to the southwest along the Meuse River. Plans to have the plants shutdown were drawn up way back in 2003. The plan was kicked into action as public hostility grew towards nuclear energy following Japan's nuclear disaster at Fukushima. It also has followed Germany's announcement that it would phase out nuclear power by 2022.

However, because nuclear accounts for such a large portion of Belgium's overall energy consumption, doing away with it requires planning and investments in alternative energy sources. According to environmental and energy analyst at Belgium's Itinera thinktank, Johan Albrecht, citing Belgian energy regulator CREG, the nation will not be ready by 2015 to replace lost capacity.

Albrecht also stated that economic developments may force policy makers to alter the plan in order for it to succeed. "Should we fall back into recession, industrial demand for electricity declines and you have a better margin to take capacity off the grid, if the economy performs well it's harder to reduce capacity."

One of the companies which owns one nuclear site, GDF Suez, saw its shares drop by 4% on Monday following the Sunday announcement. The other owner, Electrabel had refused to comment until it receives official confirmation.

Politicians are now deciding how much more the state will tax the nuclear companies moving forward. Socialist Party chief, Elio Di Rupo, has suggested raising their taxes from €215 million per year in 2009 to €1 billion per year.

By. David Gabel

Source: Environmental News Network




Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage

Trending Discussions


Leave a comment
  • Anonymous on November 04 2011 said:
    Belgium is not going to shut down all nuclear reactors by 2026. Germany is not going to dispense with nuclear power, nor is Switzerland or Japan or....Of course I wish they would, and all wires leading from Sweden to other countries except perhaps Norway and Finland were cut. Then we would be rich beyond our wildest dreams here in Sweden, because we would outproduce every nearby country - we would have a complete and absolute competitive advantage.

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News