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Defense Contracting Meets Clean Energy

US defense contractor Lockheed Martin is turning a technological corner to generate fuel from waste in a deal with California-based fuel techs Concord Blue.

Advanced waste conversion is an emerging technology that uses gasification processes to convert waste products to electricity, heat and synthetic fuels.

Lockheed and Concord Blue will address environmental issues such as congestion of landfills, improper waste management and climate change, as well as encourage production of green energy resources for commercial use.

"This agreement enables Lockheed Martin to combine our proven ability to meet complex project requirements and access to a broader, global market with Concord Blue's demonstrated technology, experience and global facilities," Paul Klammer, director of bio energy programs at Lockheed Martin's Mission Systems and Training business, told media.

Concord Blue has developed a closed-loop process that Lockheed Martin said is already commercially-proven to recycle waste into energy at virtually any scale.

Charlie Thannhaeuser, chairman and chief executive officer of Concord Blue  said that alliance with Lockheed Martin would allow Concord Blue's innovative waste recycling technology to positively impact more communities around the world.  "This collaboration will enable us to deploy a compelling solution to a significant environmental, social and safety issue that affects every region of the world."

Concord Blue has had several commercial facilities operating since as early as 2006 and more under development, mostly in India, Japan and Germany, including a plant in Prune, India, that is the largest steam thermolysis waste-to-energy plant in the world.

What does Lockheed bring to the table? Capabilities in complex systems integration, project management, information technology and advanced manufacturing techniques partnership.

Lockheed Martin entered the bioenergy arena about seven years ago beginning with development of its own biomass heating facility in Owego, N.Y., which uses wood chips to fuel two wood-fired boilers that generate steam to provide heat to the 1.8 million-square-foot site. Currently, a great deal of Lockheed Martin's bioenergy work is in Canada.

By. Charles Kennedy of Oilprice.com




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