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Metals / Commodities

  • Here's A New $1 Billion Funding Source For Mining Projects

    Finding project funds is becoming a bigger and bigger issue in the resource space. But developers in the mining sector just got some good news on an innovative new source of capital. That’s the Capital Mines Hydrocarbures fund. A C$1 billion purse being put forward by the government of one of the world’s top mining jurisdictions—the Canadian province of Quebec. Quebec’s Economy Minister said last week that the fund is now close to being ready to launch. With C$200 million already put aside—and another C$800 million in follow-on funding being prepared.Related: Is Saudi Arabia Setting The World Up For Major Oil…

  • Latest $269 Million DOE Loan Causes Major Controversy

     No doubt smarting from criticism about its lack of success in picking winners in alternative energy vehicles, the Department of Energy has given initial approval for a $269 million loan to a proven winner – Alcoa’s high-strength aluminum to make vehicles lighter and more fuel efficient. The loan in fact covers the costs for new factory capacity at Alcoa’s Tennessee plant, which the company announced nearly two years ago and which is due for completion in mid-2015. Related: What’s Really Behind The U.S Crude Oil Build It was the first loan in DOE’s Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing program in four years…

  • Mick Davis has now almost $5 billion to build new mining empire

    A few pounds less and some billions more, "Mick the Miner," is ready to go on a buying spree.After losing out in the Glencore (LON:GLEN) takeover last year, former Xstrata chief executive Mick Davis has been staging a comeback and by now he’s got $4.8 billion from investors to spend doing what he likes the most: buying assets to eventually turn his X2 Resources into a midsize metal and mining group."With almost $5bn in equity and access to significant additional debt funding, X2 Resources is uniquely positioned and we are currently reviewing a number of opportunities in the metals and…

  • Mining Sector To Experience Major Investment Over Coming Months

    Countercyclical investors sitting on $8 billion unspent funds have been waiting for clear signs of a market bottom. The wait may well be over.The mining M&A market is not exactly in robust health at the moment.Mining and metals deal values during the first half of this year tanked 69% to $16.7 billion, deal volumes are down 34% and nearly 9 out of every ten agreements were valued at less than $50m according to the latest Ernst & Young market barometer.One reason for the slackness, the consulting firm notes, is that "the much anticipated influx of substantial capital from new mining-focused…

  • This Critical Uranium Shutdown is Going Ahead

    A brief news item yesterday may be one of the most important happenings in commodities for years.The coming shutdown of one of the largest uranium mines on the planet.I noted a few weeks back that workers at Cameco's McArthur River uranium mine in northern Canada were contemplating labour action. And yesterday that threat came to fruition--with the major uranium company announcing that mineworkers' unions have authorized a full strike.It appears this action is going to bring McArthur River to a complete standstill. With Cameco saying it is now initiating shutdown activities at the mine, and the associated Key Lake uranium…

  • How to Play the Uranium Price Rebound

    When it comes to uranium market sentiment, "it's all about Japan," says David Talbot, senior mining analyst at Dundee Capital Markets. With restart applications trickling in and reactor construction underway throughout the world, a turnaround looks less like an "if" and more like a "when." In the meantime, Talbot sees many investors sitting on the sidelines. In this interview with The Energy Report, Talbot discusses the catalysts that could trigger the next uranium boom and the companies that could make investors wish they had arrived at the party a little earlier.The Energy Report: In your last interview with The Energy…

  • China Continues to Reduce Rare Earth Production as Prices Fall

    Chicken or egg, which came first?The same question could be asked of the rare earth metals market.Rare earth metal prices have been falling steadily for the last couple of years, in spite of China reducing export volumes. Usually a reduction of supply results in a rise in prices, but the falls are indicative of the size of the REE bubble that had formed around the turn of the decade.Chuin-Weip noted in the WSJ last week that Chinese exports had plummeted 71% in 2012 from 2011; however, this year has seen a remarkable change – exports have been picking up, with…

  • Japan Signs Rare Earth Deal with India

    Japan has sealed its new “friendship” in the world of rare earths by formally signing a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with India for imports of rare earth (REE) minerals annually.The agreement signed last Friday will allow Japan to import about 4,100 tons of rare earths per year from India, probably from next spring. Once upon a time, Japan used to rely almost 100% on China for its supply of rare earth minerals, a crucial component in mobile phones, hybrid cars and missile guidance systems.The imports from India will take care of about 10 percent of Japan’s peak annual demand. A…

  • Chinese Rare Earth Mining Monopoly Threatens US Defense Technology

    Technology that drives the Pentagon’s weapons program, the US auto industry and renewable energy ambitions is threatened by a lack of heavy rare earths for which China enjoys the global mining monopoly.Heavy rare earths are a class of 17 elements of a similar chemistry that are used in the production of everything from unnamed military drones, radar and navigation systems to high-performance magnets used in commercial vehicles, wind turbine technology and a host of consumer electronics.The Pentagon was caught napping in 2010, when the reality of China’s global monopoly on heavy rare earths mining hit home with Beijing’s decision to…

  • Recycling Magnets to Extract the Rare Earth Metals

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory is working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth element, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.  The initial results show the recycled material maintains the properties that made rare-earth magnets useful in the first use.The potential is important because rare earth prices increased ten-fold between 2009 and 2011 and supplies, primarily in China, are in question due to quotas for China’s internal use.This makes rare earth elements a recycling priority.  So far the process hasn’t been especially useful, but the Ames Lab is showing the recycling process can…