follow us like us subscribe contact us
Loading, please wait

Solar Power Plug Socket Turns Any Window into a Charger

By James Burgess | Wed, 08 May 2013 21:25 | 9

The conceptual solar charger known as the Window Socket has been everywhere on the internet lately, and whilst many have been criticising its lack of energy storage and the low current that it provides, I for one am very impressed.

The simple solar charger was created by Kyuho Song and Boa Oh of Korea, and is designed to attach, via a suction pad, to any window that receives sunlight, and immediately begin producing electricity.

The small device has a plug socket (European connection only at the moment) which can be used to charge small devices directly, or it can also store charge in a battery for up to 10 hours, to act as a fully portable charge station.

Related article: Falling Solar Costs Drive Increase in Number of Large Scale Solar Installations

The main drawbacks for which the device receives criticism is that it takes five to eight hours to fully charge the battery, and it can only supply 1000mAh, which is only enough to charge smart phones, and other low voltage gadgets. My support of the device comes from the belief that 10 hours charge time is plenty, it is better than nothing, and can always be recharged again just by placing it in the sun. Also, I would have thought that smart phones would be the main gadget in need of portable charging. It may also be useful to have the capability of charging a laptop in the future, but what other portable devices do people carry around with them that sometimes need urgent charging in remote locations?

The designers explained that: “this product is intended to enabled you to use electricity freely and conveniently in a space restricted in the use of electricity, such as in a plane, a car, and outdoors. Thus, this product was meant to draw out a socket used indoors outward. We tried to design a portable socket, so that users can use it intuitively.”

Window Socket

Window Socket 1

Window Socket 2
(Images from Yanko Design)

By. James Burgess of Oilprice.com

Leave a comment

  • Abel Tselanngwe on July 29 2014 said:
    i am very interested in this device, it will be great to know where to get the sample because they will love it in my country. please come back to me with a reply
  • Sadie on July 09 2013 said:
    This is an amazing invention!! Im going on a long trip next spring break and this would be a life saver!! Where can I buy one? Whats the price?
  • Danna on June 19 2013 said:
    How do I get a sample of this? I really think that this product would thrive in my country, as we have a lot of sun, and we have many poor people who cannot afford electricity at home so after work they can get home and charge their phones or plug in small lamps etc
  • S&B on June 12 2013 said:
    Is this item for sale? Where is the purchase link?
  • Greg Mason Burns on May 15 2013 said:
    Not sure why this needs to be just an on-the-go charger. Why not use it in the house to actually plug something in? Imagine when a laptop can be plugged into this - no more plugging that into your wall. Imagine the next step of having one for your blender.

    Seriously, the potential is pretty amazing. Not everyone can put large solar panels on the top of the apt building they live in, so this could potentially bring solar power to more people.
  • Peggy Yost on May 09 2013 said:
    Imagine the potential... life saving. When such a device evolves to be able to attach to a rock, for example, a lost hiker with no charge on his/her cell phone will eventually have ability to call for help.
  • Charlene Lee on May 09 2013 said:
    Hey:

    It's a great beginning. All things have to begin somewhere, so stop complaining.
  • Bob on May 09 2013 said:
    Great. Another worthless solar charger.

    Here's the problem: It's too small. That solar cell delivers ... what? 35 mA at 5V if it's lucky. It fully charges in 5 to 8 hours, ok. That's tops, 280 mAH (at 5V) of capacity. That's enough to charge your Smartphone for less than half an hour. 1000mA? minutes at best.

    Add to that the inefficiencies of the DC to AC inverter, and you'll be lucky to get 15 minutes charge time per day.
  • Norman Dean III on May 09 2013 said:
    Very interesting and would be interested in a sample to use.

Leave a comment