• 2 hours Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 2 hours Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 3 hours China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 4 hours UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 4 hours Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 5 hours VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 6 hours Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 7 hours Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 8 hours OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 24 hours U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 1 day Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 1 day Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 1 day EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 1 day Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 1 day Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO
  • 4 days Trump Passes Iran Nuclear Deal Back to Congress
  • 4 days Texas Shutters More Coal-Fired Plants
  • 4 days Oil Trading Firm Expects Unprecedented U.S. Crude Exports
  • 4 days UK’s FCA Met With Aramco Prior To Proposing Listing Rule Change
  • 4 days Chevron Quits Australian Deepwater Oil Exploration
  • 5 days Europe Braces For End Of Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 5 days Renewable Energy Startup Powering Native American Protest Camp
  • 5 days Husky Energy Set To Restart Pipeline
  • 5 days Russia, Morocco Sign String Of Energy And Military Deals
  • 5 days Norway Looks To Cut Some Of Its Generous Tax Breaks For EVs
  • 5 days China Set To Continue Crude Oil Buying Spree, IEA Says
  • 5 days India Needs Help To Boost Oil Production
  • 5 days Shell Buys One Of Europe’s Largest EV Charging Networks
  • 5 days Oil Throwback: BP Is Bringing Back The Amoco Brand
  • 5 days Libyan Oil Output Covers 25% Of 2017 Budget Needs
  • 5 days District Judge Rules Dakota Access Can Continue Operating
  • 6 days Surprise Oil Inventory Build Shocks Markets
  • 6 days France’s Biggest Listed Bank To Stop Funding Shale, Oil Sands Projects
  • 6 days Syria’s Kurds Aim To Control Oil-Rich Areas
  • 6 days Chinese Teapots Create $5B JV To Compete With State Firms
  • 6 days Oil M&A Deals Set To Rise
  • 6 days South Sudan Tightens Oil Industry Security
  • 7 days Over 1 Million Bpd Remain Offline In Gulf Of Mexico
  • 7 days Turkmenistan To Spend $93-Billion On Oil And Gas Sector
  • 7 days Indian Hydrocarbon Projects Get $300 Billion Boost Over 10 Years
5 Players To Watch In The FinTech Revolution

5 Players To Watch In The FinTech Revolution

Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain tech…

Japan’s L Zero Maglev Train Sets New Speed Record of 310mph

Long distance travel is one of the few sectors that has experienced little technological advancement over the past decades, yet recently some persons, most notably Elon Musk’s Hyperloop, have begun to turn their attention on this relatively forgotten sector.

The ideal manner for long distance travel in the future (other than teleportation) would be a way that provided comfort, immense speed, and low carbon emissions.

The Hyperloop promises to send people along a smooth tube at speeds of up to 4,000mph on international trips, and if built would create a revolution in the travel industry; but for the time being it remains an idea, and truthfully I think that any plans to make it a reality are remote.

Related article: Looking at the Hyperloop and its Predecessors

In Asia however, long distance transport seems to be getting easier and faster, after a new world record was recently set by the brand new Japanese Maglev train.

The L Zero maglev train.
The L Zero maglev train. (Bloomberg)

During a flawless test run on a 27 mile track, the L Zero Maglev train recorded a speed of 310 mph, a world train speed record; and one of the most incredible things for an object moving at such speed is that the journalists travelling on board reported that “they could barely feel a thing.”

Phys.org explained that “the train does have wheels — it rides on them when the train is at low speed — then rises up above the track when it reaches approximately 93 mph. On the test run, the train reached its peak speed just three miles into the trip.”

Related article: Why Work Should Begin on Elon Musk’s Hyperloop Immediately!

Maglev trains are able to travel at such speeds due to the fact that they ride on a cushion of air, dramatically reducing the friction that builds up in normal land based vehicles moving at high speed. This lack of friction means that the maglev trains need far less energy to move, and due to the lack of contact, mechanical wear is low, making maintenance costs much lower than normal.

The major downside with maglev technology is the huge installation cost, and it is still unknown if the reduced operations and maintenance cost makes up for this. The proposed line between Tokyo and Osaka is expected to cost nearly $90 billion and won’t be completed until 2045. A shorter track between Tokyp and Nagoya is expected to be finished by 2027, and will reduce the travel time from 95 minutes to 40 minutes.

By. Joao Peixe of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News