• 1 hour Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 2 hours Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 3 hours China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 3 hours UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 4 hours Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 5 hours VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 6 hours Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 7 hours Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 8 hours OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 23 hours U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 1 day Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 1 day Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 1 day EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 1 day Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 1 day Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO
  • 4 days Trump Passes Iran Nuclear Deal Back to Congress
  • 4 days Texas Shutters More Coal-Fired Plants
  • 4 days Oil Trading Firm Expects Unprecedented U.S. Crude Exports
  • 4 days UK’s FCA Met With Aramco Prior To Proposing Listing Rule Change
  • 4 days Chevron Quits Australian Deepwater Oil Exploration
  • 5 days Europe Braces For End Of Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 5 days Renewable Energy Startup Powering Native American Protest Camp
  • 5 days Husky Energy Set To Restart Pipeline
  • 5 days Russia, Morocco Sign String Of Energy And Military Deals
  • 5 days Norway Looks To Cut Some Of Its Generous Tax Breaks For EVs
  • 5 days China Set To Continue Crude Oil Buying Spree, IEA Says
  • 5 days India Needs Help To Boost Oil Production
  • 5 days Shell Buys One Of Europe’s Largest EV Charging Networks
  • 5 days Oil Throwback: BP Is Bringing Back The Amoco Brand
  • 5 days Libyan Oil Output Covers 25% Of 2017 Budget Needs
  • 5 days District Judge Rules Dakota Access Can Continue Operating
  • 6 days Surprise Oil Inventory Build Shocks Markets
  • 6 days France’s Biggest Listed Bank To Stop Funding Shale, Oil Sands Projects
  • 6 days Syria’s Kurds Aim To Control Oil-Rich Areas
  • 6 days Chinese Teapots Create $5B JV To Compete With State Firms
  • 6 days Oil M&A Deals Set To Rise
  • 6 days South Sudan Tightens Oil Industry Security
  • 7 days Over 1 Million Bpd Remain Offline In Gulf Of Mexico
  • 7 days Turkmenistan To Spend $93-Billion On Oil And Gas Sector
  • 7 days Indian Hydrocarbon Projects Get $300 Billion Boost Over 10 Years
Oil Prices Poised To Rise In Early 2018

Oil Prices Poised To Rise In Early 2018

A consistent fall in comparative…

Drone Deliveries May Be Closer Than We Think

Everyone knows that Amazon, the retailer that sells, well, everything, hopes to soon make at least some of its deliveries with flying drones dispatched from warehouses.

That’s still a couple of years away, so the delivery truck is still king.

AMP Electric Vehicles in Loveland, OH is working on bringing the two together. With a team of researchers at the University of Cincinnati, the company is trying to develop an electric delivery van that can carry “octocopters” -- nicknamed HorseFlies — which are electrically powered, eight-rotor drone helicopters.

The idea is that a delivery truck cruising along its normal route usually has a few stops to make that are out of the way and not near any others. Instead of burning enough fuel to power a 10-ton van a few extra miles to drop off a lightweight package, the driver could stay on his main route and send the drone to drop off the package.

UPS already has found that little changes in routes can save a lot of money. Over the past decade, its drivers have been trained to avoid left turns, a practice that the company estimates already has saved it about 10 million gallons of gasoline. AMP says its solution also could save enough time and gasoline to spark the interest of companies like Amazon and FedEx.

Related Article: An Oil Company Has Beat Amazon’s Drones Into The Skies

Steve Burns, the co-founder and CEO of AMP, says his company already makes an electric delivery van called the Workhorse. After hearing of Amazon’s plan to use flying drones for some deliveries, he began working with researchers at the University of Cincinnati to begin developing the HorseFly.

What’s key, Burns says, is pairing the drones with the trucks. Conventionally, delivery trucks hold enough packages to cover a driver’s route. The route is designed to ensure no waste of time or energy. Amazon’s idea is to send package-carrying drones from warehouses. But to match a truck’s capacity, a warehouse-based drone would have to make up to 150 round trips a day, and that’s not efficient.

Launching the HorseFlies from a truck already near the customer makes much more economic sense, according to AMP’s Dan Zito. “That makes it unique,” he says.

By Andy Tully of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News