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Energy / Natural Gas

  • Europe Seeks To Undermine Russian Energy Influence

    The fragile ceasefire and negotiations between Ukraine and Russia have revived hopes that the months-long violent conflict in Eastern Europe is nearing its end. However, many questions remain unanswered, as hostilities and distrust between the confronted parties continues to plague a potential peaceful solution.With the Ukrainian conflict unresolved and winter in sight, the EU will not only have the grand task of preparing the continent for the possibility of energy shortages, but also to define its long-term energy goals.Most East European EU members depend heavily on natural gas supplies from Russia. Despite the last mild winter and efforts to stockpile…

  • Study Finds Treated Fracking Wastewater Still Too Toxic

    One of the biggest concerns about hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is that the vast amount of wastewater produced by the process of extracting oil and gas from shale rock deep underground is incredibly toxic.  Most often, the wastewater is injected into disposal wells deep underground. But a process does exist to convert contaminated water into drinking water that involves running it through wastewater treatment plants and into rivers. Now a new report says that treated wastewater could be fouling drinking water supplies.Related: Researchers Call For New Approach To Recycling Fracking Waste WaterIn an article published in Environmental Science & Technology…

  • Pipeline Delays May See Moldova Return To Russia For Its Gas

    While the cease-fire between Ukraine and pro-Russian and Russian fighters holds steady, another fight is poised to begin over Russian gas for Ukraine. And, this time, it’s a fight that, by default, involves Ukraine’s small, pro-Western neighbor, Moldova, too.Currently, Moldova, the recent signatory of a European Union Association Agreement, relies entirely on natural gas from Russia, delivered via Ukraine. Moldovagaz, a company half-owned by the Russian energy giant Gazprom and 35.3 percent by the Moldovan government, controls distribution of that gas. In late August, with the inauguration of a 43-kilometer-long pipeline from neighboring Romania, Moldova took a first step toward…

  • With LNG Export Battle Won, Are Oil Exports Next?

    Building on its success in getting the U.S. government to approve exports of natural gas, the oil and gas industry has moved on to the export of crude oil. To be sure, the campaign has been underway for quite a while. The four-decade old ban has been under attack over the past year because of the glut of oil that has come onto the market. Increased supplies in places like North Dakota and Texas have led to a significant price discount between the Brent benchmark, which largely reflects international prices, and the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) benchmark based in Cushing,…

  • Larger Than Expected Natural Gas Inventories Spells Trouble for Producers

    In a surprising turn of events, rising supplies of oil and tepid global demand have caused prices to crash to their lowest levels in years.And the same phenomenon may be playing out for natural gas, at least in the United States. An increase in supply and soft summer demand are combining to see rapid build ups in storage inventory, according to new data from the Energy Information Administration. But let’s back up a minute. The unusually cold winter of 2014 saw a record-breaking drawdown in natural gas inventories as power plants ramped up to supply enough heating, particularly on the…

  • America’s Big Bet On Natural Gas And Big Short On Coal

    America is betting the kitchen sink on natural gas. No matter which estimate you look at -- the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the International Energy Agency, or Wall Street banks -- two things are clear: the United States is slated to consume enormous amounts of natural gas and the dominant fuel of electricity generation for the last 50 years, coal, is diminishing. First, America’s energy darling: natural gas. It is difficult to overstate the effect shale gas production has had on the United States. In 2006, shale gas production accounted for about 5 percent of natural gas production. In 2013,…

  • Canada’s Shale Boom: More To Come In Montney

    In the world of a constantly changing oil and gas environment, the Montney shale basin is the sleeping giant that holds the key to accelerating Canada’s shale oil and gas boom, but the real treasure within this giant is a tight liquids-rich zone (approximately 15-20 miles wide) that has big and small players alike narrowing their focus for the potential of a giant payout.   A pervasive hydrocarbon system in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) in Alberta and British Columbia, the Montney is estimated to hold 2,200 trillion cubic feet of gas, almost 29 billion barrels of natural gas liquids and…

  • True Cause Of Fracking Leaks Found – Industry Breathes A Sigh Of Relief

    An Ohio State University led study has pinpointed the likely source of most natural gas contamination in drinking-water wells associated with hydraulic fracturing as the walls of the gas well and their well casing seal to the ground.It’s not the source many people may have feared and, if the press can get its facts – truth – and integrity act together, the news should enable the natural gas industry, the state regulators and well engineers an opportunity to solve the public’s anti fracking issue with real results for much improved water well protection.Related: The Consequences Of Fracking: Two Clashing ViewsThe…

  • Why the Debate Over U.S. LNG Exports Has Been Won

    The debate over natural gas exports appears to be over. On Sept. 10, the U.S. Department of Energy approved two more export terminals for liquefied natural gas (LNG) and it barely made any news. The decision means that there are now three projects that have cleared all hurdles, allowing construction to begin. More are in the offing. The Obama administration has shown itself entirely open to idea of exporting LNG, even though it prefers a gradual and deliberate approach rather than the blanket approval favored by the oil and gas industry. Environmental groups have opposed exports, arguing that opening up…

  • Gazprom Neft Can Sidestep Sanctions, But Not For Long

    Western sanctions won’t change any business plans for the Russian oil company Gazprom Neft during what’s left of 2014, but a senior executive says it is considering options for next year.Even now, Gazprom Neft is feeling a bit of a pinch, Deputy CEO Vadim Yakovlev told reporters on Sept. 15 aboard the Prirazlomnaya oil rig in the Pechora Sea in the Russian Arctic. “I do not think that we can stop our projects due to problems with financing,” he said, noting that borrowing has become more costly as the number of offers for financing declined.The sanctions, imposed Sept. 12, shut…