follow us like us subscribe contact us
Adbar

The Era of Cheap Gasoline is Over

By Daniel J. Graeber | Thu, 19 September 2013 22:50 | 3

Motor group AAA reports the national average for a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline for Wednesday was $3.50, down more than 30 cents from the same time last year. Refiners are starting to switch to the cheaper winter blend of gasoline, suggesting prices will continue to decline for the rest of the year. That scenario is supported by the recent increase in Libyan oil production and indications military action in Syria is off the table for the time being. The last time the average price for a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline in the United States was below $3.00, however, was the day before Christmas Eve 2010. AAA said that, on average, prices may never be that low again.

Midseason refinery issues and security concerns in the Middle East and North America pushed gasoline prices about the $4.00 per gallon mark in the Midwest market this year. A few months and a Labor Day holiday later, and Midwest states like Ohio, Indiana and Michigan are paying almost 50 cents less than they were during the summer. The U.S. Energy Department said the national average peaked at $3.68 in July, but by the time its short-term energy report was published last week, even West Coast consumers were experiencing less pain at the pump. The report attributed lower prices to "ample inventories" and the absence of outages like last year's disaster at Chevron's Richmond refinery.

Related article: Why Fuel Subsidies are Bad for Everyone

The Energy Department said it expects gasoline consumption to decline as more fuel-efficient vehicles travel U.S. highways. Less demand typically translates to lower prices.  The price of oil as of July accounted for 70 percent of the price at the pump, according to the department's Energy Information Administration. The price for West Texas Intermediate and Brent crude remain above the $105 per barrel level because of lingering tensions in the Middle East and North Africa. That price is declining, however, on word military intervention in Syria will have to wait. The resumption of activity at Libya's El Sharara oilfield, meanwhile, gave hope to traders worried about the country's post-civil war decline.

Refiners started switching over to cheaper winter blends this month, which should push gasoline prices lower. EIA expects an average retail prices for a gallon of gasoline of $3.44 during the fourth quarter of the year. The average yearly price for 2012 was $3.63 and next year's should be $3.43 per gallon. But AAA said that's approaching the limit. Tuesday marked the 1000th consecutive day with a national average above $3.00 per gallon, the longest streak on record.  AAA said that, despite the emerging fourth quarter trend, $3.00 for a gallon of gasoline "may be automotive history for most Americans."

By. Daniel J. Graeber of Oilprice.com

About the author

Contributor
Daniel J. Graeber
Company: Oilprice.com
Position: Senior Analyst

More recent articles by Daniel J. Graeber

Thu 17 April 2014
Putin is Losing Eastern European Energy Gamble
Wed 16 April 2014
Private Sector Driving U.S. Wind Market Forward
Tue 15 April 2014
Why Angola may be the next OPEC Darling
Mon 14 April 2014
U.S. Gas Prices Rise, but not because of Global Factors
Sun 13 April 2014
Eastern Europe has Nothing on Asian Energy Markets

Leave a comment

  • Jim Hannan on September 20 2013 said:
    I'm wondering if there won't be a move to replace OPEC. Russia, Iran, Iraq and Venezuela together produce over 21 million barrels of oil per day, about 25% of world production. It seems to me that they could get together and become the new OPEC. Saudi Arabia is already stretched just to make up for the recent shortfall from Libyan oil fields.
    I think the Russians could say something like this: We would like to see oil at $140 per barrel. We will take off the world market enough oil to reach that price.
  • Gal Sitty on September 20 2013 said:
    The era of cheap gasoline may be over, but that doesn't the era of cheap fuel has to be. If we allow our cars to be powered by proven replacement fuels, we can have plenty of cheap fuel. Methanol made from natural gas (of which we have plenty of cheap supply available in the U.S.) is one option. Ethanol (which is produced much cheaper than gasoline) is another; with improving technology, ethanol is likely to get cheaper. These other fuels, unlike gasoline, can also be made from renewables- meaning we won't run out of their feedstock and we can keep prices low.
  • peter clarke on September 22 2013 said:
    Only trouble with ethanol is that it takes more energy to make a gallon of ethanol than you get back when you burn it and the energy to make it comes from oil so you are better off burning the oil. In addition it would take all the arable land in the US and more to replace the oil usage with ethanol so no more food, I expect you can see the problem with that.

Leave a comment