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US Coal to Gasoline Plant Will be the Largest in the World

By Al Fin | Mon, 01 November 2010 14:33 | 13

TransGas Development Systems, LLC announced an agreement with SK Engineering & Construction Co., Ltd (SKE&C) leading to engineering, procurement and construction of its first US coal-to-gasoline plant—Adams Fork Energy—to be located in Mingo County, West Virginia. _GCC

US coal deposits contain 12 X as much energy as all known oil in Saudi Arabia. The gasification process to be used in the new West Virginia CTL plant could cleanly utilise coals of any grade -- including the cheapest and dirtiest coal. By moving US coal reserves into the liquid fuels arena, the prospects for peak oil continue to remain slight -- unless the Obama administration decides to shut down all coal, even clean coal projects. Obama has promised to bankrupt coal companies, and all his other policies are consistent with an "energy starvation" approach to shutting down US industrial production. Time will tell.

The Adams Fork Energy project will convert regional coal into premium-grade gasoline, producing 18,000 barrels per day (756,000 gallons US, 2.86 million liters). When fully developed, the Adams Fork project will be the largest coal-to-gasoline project in the world, according to Adam Victor, President and CEO of TransGas Development Systems.

The project team has been issued a permit to construct by the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection and plans to begin work on the site during the second quarter of 2011.

The plant will have several process components. First, coal is gasified to produce synthesis gas, using Uhde PRENFLO PDQ gasifiers. The synthesis gas will then be cleaned to remove impurities, turning most into marketable byproducts. Next, the synthesis gas will be converted into methanol, which in turn will be converted into gasoline utilizing ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company’s (EMRE) MTG process. During the operation of the integrated facility, air emissions are expected to be so low that it will qualify as a minor source under US law. _GCC

By. Al Fin

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  • Anonymous on November 01 2010 said:
    This is an interesting and perhaps a very important project. We need to know a lot more about it.
  • Anonymous on November 02 2010 said:
    I have not seen anyone do this for under $4 bucks a gallon.But as oil tightens this will be very competitive. If you can you crappy coal like lignite the you are sitting on a gold mine.But what are the byproducts can you put them back in the ground?? This can affect cost greatly.Red
  • Anonymous on November 03 2010 said:
    By what stretch of the imagination do you think this means "the prospects for peak oil remain slight"? Point 1, US uses millions of barrels per day by itself, so this "Largest In The World" plant is literally a drop in the bucket. Hirsch, who is orders of magnitude more qualified to comment than this guy, said to the USDE that if all nations of the world co-operated it would take more than 20 years to convert oil infrastructure over to alternatives such as this. During that time we still have chronic, economic growth killing shortages. 20 YEARS.
  • Anonymous on November 07 2010 said:
    US largest CTL project! At 18,000 barrels pd the country would need to build over 600 of these "beauties" just to substitute for imported oil alone. of course, nothing is mentioned of the cost of even one of these projects, the time it would take to build, nor the environmental consequences of releasing even more carbon pollution into the atmosphere.
  • Anonymous on November 07 2010 said:
    It looks like quite a good start. A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.
  • Anonymous on November 08 2010 said:
    What a crock. Coal to liquids is a prime example of peak oil, not its slayer. Did you miss the fact that the liquid fuels are coming from coal and not from petroleum?This is a big sign of desperation, meaning the US is in the same energy position as was Nazi Germany when it failed to seize the Baku oil fields from the soviets in WWII. Forgetting for a minute that Peabody has to blow the tops off mountains to get coal in WV, what do you suppose the net energy of these dubious projects really is?
  • Just a coal miner on January 19 2012 said:
    So maybe it will take 600 of these plants to offset our foreign oil needs. Do you have a better solution? The whole world would like to hear it if you do. So if it takes 20 years then I'd say we had better get started don't you? If you oppose coal so greatly then prove it...go off the grid an use whatever means you can to live a normal life. Turn off you power. Oh wait you can't do that can you. That would be just unheard of! Coal is a necessary evil that we all need. When you prove cold fusion is feasible then you should down coal an all of it's nasty pollutants. A step in the right direction! That's what I say...but hey I am just a dumb coal miner is your eyes.
  • like clean air and water on January 19 2012 said:
    This is just a horrible idea. More mountains blown to bits and water use for oil that is not conserved and used to create more junk and allow unconserved driving. Come on people-think about the future. Mingo County is one of the poorest counties, a result of a history of coal extraction for a couple of centuries. This is junk.
  • no coal or gas on January 19 2012 said:
    NO such thing as a dumb coal miner, just corrupt companies that don't really care about your job, community or future. They will pull out as soon as the money is made. Yes we can dump coal and gas (no fracking too)
  • RolfeO on January 21 2012 said:
    Let's get on with it. We need to use coal. Impact of additional CO2 into the atmosphere is not likely a problem, we are at very low levels historically. Just keep the damn wind turbines out of my back yard and on the east coast so the Kennedy family can enjoy them!
  • nonbodycares on June 22 2012 said:
    in reality to provide all the gas we need you would only need 100 of these plants in the US. also not all coal comes from strip mines a lot comes from deep mines. this could put a lot of miners back to work also. more taxes and jobs for communities.
  • unemployed miner on February 26 2013 said:
    I'm always amazed at how you lefties successfully change the argument. Instead of continuing a discussion about ways to remove America's dependency upon foreign oil, which would coincidentally remove our need to spend trillions of dollars in middle eastern countries, you transform the argument into a discussion of Nazis and the environment.

    Afterall, it's so much more important--he said sarcastically--that we NEVER do anything that Hitler did, and that we protect unusable land on the tops of mountains so that people who don't live here can look at them pretty hillbilly pictures.
  • Chuck Collins on August 27 2013 said:
    Never underestimate the potential of the United States to produce strategic products when political will is united behind it. Just as in WWII, our national future depends upon it. If the politicians won't act, then the American people might do so when the Federal Reserve and Wall street commodity traders drive up conventional oil to $200 a barrel and above. At least, let's hope so!

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