Insider Secrets

Insider Secrets

Learn how the PROs are making money from the oil and energy market.

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Alternative Energy / Wind Power

  • The Best Play In Wind Energy Right Now

    Let’s face it; investing in wind power in any meaningful way is difficult. Everything points to serious growth in the industry over the next few years, not least the fact that, despite falling costs and profitable operations from many in the business, the industry still receives generous treatment and subsidies from most governments around the world. You only have to read one of the many reports such as this from the U.S. Department of Energy or read that three American states now meet over 20 percent of their energy needs from wind to start salivating as an energy investor. That…

  • Top Wind Energy Stocks For Renewables Investors

     Solar power appears to be hitting some technological hurdles, if the slowing rate of innovation in that industry is any indication. This apparent slowdown could well afford the wind sector the ideal opportunity to gain some momentum in the renewables space, spread further across the United States while also attracting more investment. Currently wind power is generating roughly 5% of the overall power for the country as a whole, and considerably more than that in the Midwest where a lot of wind farms are concentrated. States like Minnesota, Kansas, and Iowa are generating 15 to 30% of their power from…

  • Post-Fukushima Japan Turns To Wind As Solution For Energy Crisis

    The kamikaze pilots that flew bombing raids and suicide missions against the Allies in World War Two were inspired by a “divine wind” that they believed was keeping their planes aloft in the service of the Japanese Empire. Legend has it that the divine wind from which the word “kamikaze” is translated, referred to a typhoon that saved the Japanese islands from invasion by a Mongol fleet in 1281. Seventy years after the end of the Second World War, nature continues to exert a powerful influence on the Japanese nation, and we only have to look back four years to…

  • Christie’s White House Ambitions Block NJ Wind Project

    New Jersey’s plans for offshore wind energy have been stymied so far by a Catch-22 and backers blame Gov. Chris Christie’s presidential ambitions for blocking the project. The recent storm over Christie’s intervention to accept a much smaller settlement in a long-running pollution case against Exxon Mobil – the state settled for $225 million on a claim of $8.9 billion has confirmed for many that Christie is putting campaign donations for a White House bid ahead of his original vision for the state. The irony is that Christie has framed his eventual national appeal on his ability to win elections…

  • Wind Could Meet 20% Of U.S. Electricity By 2030

    Wind power may soon be coming to a field near you. The Department of Energy (DOE) published a major report looking at the viability of scaling up wind power in the United States. Wind power now makes up 4.5 percent of electricity generation in the United States, with 65 gigawatts located across 39 states. But DOE concluded that ramping up wind to meet 20 percent of the nation’s electricity generation by 2030 and 35 percent by 2050 is not only eminently doable, but would also provide a variety of economic benefits.Related: No Country For King Coal – The Changing U.S. Energy…

  • Wind May Win The Renewable Race – But At What Price?

    You only need to drive the long, lonely stretches of highway in west Texas, Kansas, Nebraska, Ohio, Colorado or even parts of California to know that wind farms have become prolific across America. In fact, there are over 48,000 wind turbines spinning their blades in at least 39 states including Alaska, Hawaii and even in Puerto Rico. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released an Executive Summary on wind last week, including some interesting, but possibly ambitious, projections. According to the DOE, wind has become the fastest-growing source of alternative energy since 2000. In 2008, the report claims, wind provided…

  • Scotland’s Wind Dream May Turn Into A Nightmare

    I last looked into the details and consequences of Scottish energy policy in the pre-referendum post Scotch on the ROCs. The expansion of Scottish renewables is progressing at breakneck speed and the purpose of this post is to update on where we are and where we are heading whether anyone likes it or not (Figure 1). Objections to wind power normally come from rural dwelling country folks whose lives are impacted by the construction of wind turbine power stations around them. My objections tend to be rooted more in the raison d’être for renewables (CO2 reduction), their cost, grid reliability…

  • Kenya to Develop Africa’s Largest Wind Project

    Kenya may soon be home to the largest wind project on the continent of Africa. Danish wind company Vestas won a contract to provide 365 turbines for a 310 megawatt wind power project in Kenya. The Lake Turkana Wind Power project will be the largest of its kind in Africa, and is expected to generate 15-20 percent of Kenya’s electricity needs when completed. According to project developers, the site is a unique location that is favorable for wind. It is situated at high altitude (2,300 meters), and has consistent and predictable wind patterns. If the project sticks to its schedule,…

  • Wind Power Finally Takes Hold In United States

    At first glance, wind power might seem to be an easy road in the trip to renewable energy: Set up a turbine and begin cranking. But where turbines have been installed, nearby residents have complained about the sight and noise. Beyond that, the costs to set up wind farms are high.As a result, wind power has developed sluggishly in the United States – until recently, according to a report commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). There are now 14 offshore wind projects in advanced stages of development in the U.S. that are expected to be completed within the…

  • Will Airborne Wind Turbines Soon Float Above Our Cities?

    A few months ago, and without much fanfare, Fairbanks, Alaska hoisted a large, oval, 35-foot diameter wind turbine to an altitude of 1,000 feet over the town. From high above, the BAT (Buoyant Air Turbine) generates power from gusts of wind far stronger than those powering regular wind turbines. So how is the first airborne wind turbine to be deployed doing compared to the more familiar ground-based turbines? A 1-megawatt (1MW) turbine on the ground generates on average between 2.4 million and 4 million kilowatt hours (kWh) of energy a year, which is enough to power between 240 and 400…

Martin tiller