Insider Secrets

Insider Secrets

Learn how the PROs are making money from the oil and energy market.

Loading, please wait

Alternative Energy

  • 6 Things to do with Nuclear Waste: None of them Ideal

    High-level radioactive or nuclear waste is “spent” uranium fuel used in nuclear reactors. This spent fuel is thermally hot and highly radioactive, usually in the form of uranium 235 contained in ceramic pellets inside metal rods. What do we do with this spent fuel? Right now, nothing really, presumably we are waiting for a future generation to figure out where to safely store it all. It will only be rendered harmless through a process of decay that can take thousands of years. The US, which had over 72,000 tons of nuclear waste as of 2011, has no long-term facility for…

  • The Top 4 Advanced Biofuels: Keeping Food on the Table

    As the fuel versus food debate intensifies, Oilprice.com takes a look at the top four advanced, non-food biofuels that may have a long-term potential to become commercially, and hopefully environmentally, viable. The production of advanced biofuels was up this year by some 437 million gallons over last year, but economic challenges remain formidable and technology will be the key to unlocking potential. Perhaps things are so great right now for the advanced biofuels industry, but it will take time and patience to figure out how to appease both the market and Mother Nature.  Algae: Growing on UsAlgae produces some carbon dioxide…

  • NASA Joins the Solar Energy Space Race

    A Californian technology consultancy has joined the race to launch a solar power satellite [SPS] designed to generate solar energy in space and beam it down to earth.Artemis Innovation Management Solutions has recruited former NASA engineer John Mankins to develop a prototype, with seed funding from NASA. Mankins has already come up with the concept, called SPS-ALPHA, for ‘Solar Power Satellite via Arbitrarily Large Phase Array’. Which, very basically, means building huge platforms in space comprising concentrated photovoltaic [PV] panels and systems for wireless power transmission.Mankins is confident about the technology; it’s the cost that worries him. Of course, it…

  • Spinach - The New Ingredient for a Biohybrid Solar Cell

    Scientists have combined spinach’s photosynthetic protein, which converts light into electrochemical energy, with silicon in a new “biohybrid” solar cell.“This combination produces current levels almost 1,000 times higher than we were able to achieve by depositing the protein on various types of metals. It also produces a modest increase in voltage,” says David Cliffel, associate professor of chemistry at Vanderbilt University, who collaborated on the project with Kane Jennings, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering.“If we can continue on our current trajectory of increasing voltage and current levels, we could reach the range of mature solar conversion technologies in three…

  • Sailing the Solar Currents of Space

    Technologies tend to change all the time as improvements are made and new designs are implemented that produce more power or a higher efficiency. One of the few technologies that has not changed much over the years is propulsion technology for space shuttles and rockets. The earliest Space rockets were just larger, slightly more sophisticated versions of weapons used during World War 2. Solid fuels are still used for propelling rockets out of the Earth’s orbit, and will likely be used for many years to come, however alternative deep-space propulsion systems  are being developed and tested with fairly promising results.One…

  • Looking at the Technologies being Developed to Extract Energy from the Oceans

    Renewable energy is often dominated in the discussions by solar, wind and biomass. While they already have a wide fan base, yet another promising emerging technology is marine power.Marine power is a renewable source classified as “third-generation,” or those that need further research and development efforts in order for them to make large contributions to the global energy mix.According to analyst Global Information, Inc., the global marine energy sector’s installed capacity in 2009 was 270 megawatts. This figure is expected to balloon to over 46,000 MW by 2020.There are five technologies being developed which aim to extract energy from the…

  • Jatropha, Wonder Biofuel, Continues to Crash and Burn in the Third World

    In the fervent race to bring cost-effective biofuels to market, the three leading contenders are algae, Camelina and Jatropha.Jatropha’s promoters have been the fastest off the block, as substantial technological problems remain with algae, and Camelina’s per acre yield of biofuel is less than Jatropha’s.But now, another Third World project to cultivate Jatropha has crashed and burned.Jatropha, a fast-growing, drought-resistant tree native to Latin America, was introduced to Zimbabwe in the 1940s. It is found in many parts of the country, with concentrations in the North Eastern districts of Mutoko, Wedza, Chiweshe, Mudzi, Nynaga North, Guruve and Binga. Beginning in…

  • Using Yeast to Create Biofuel

    Scientists are using yeast to synthesise a biofuel without taking up swathes of land.Microorganisms engineered to produce a new type of biofuel, bisabolane, have the potential to produce transport fuels without putting large swathes of land under energy crops.Common liquid biofuels such as bioethanol compete with food production and are energy intensive to produce. But scientists at the Joint BioEnergy Institute, a US Department of Energy research centre, believe the new technique could provide an environmentally benign solution which could be used in existing diesel engines as part of a fuel mix, in the same way that bioethanol is commonly…

  • French Nuclear "Incident" Raises Concerns

    In the 1960s, as the U.S. “Atoms for Peace” program got into full swing, promoting civilian nuclear electricity propagation, no European country bought into the concept more deeply than France.Seduced by the concept of electricity “too cheap to measure,” France began developing a massive nuclear energy program with minimal public debate after the first oil crisis in 1974 and continued to support nuclear power even after the 1986 Soviet Chernobyl disaster. The March 2011 debacle at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex heightened the French public’s concerns, but France abandoning nuclear power is an order of magnitude more difficult than neighbouring…

  • Update: Cold Fusion Progress in 2012

    Sterling Allen interviewed Michael McKubre of SRI International, the international research lab in Menlo Park, CA in a one and a half hour talk covering a wide range of topics.  McKubre, long-time cold fusion researcher, has one of the best views of the LENR or Cold Fusion field with experience to match.  Allen offers great enthusiasm and good journalist skills to get information acquired and presented.  Here we’ll cover some of the gentlemen’s high points of the discussion.  The full report by Allen is this link.First up is the scale of the National Instruments Week (NIWeek) convention in Texas a…

Martin tiller