Share
0
Facebook
0
LinkedIn
0
Twitter
0
GooglePlus
0
Reddit
0
StumbleUpon
Loading, please wait

Alternative Energy

  • The Inevitability of the Nuclear Age

    I am firmly convinced that one of the best investment opportunities in the world today is in nuclear power. In this article I will discuss why that is, and how one can go about making such investments. The first point to be made in any discussion of a coming nuclear renaissance is that peak oil is real. In other words, oil production will continue to decline over the next couple decades, at a time when population and energy demand are rising. This creates a situation in which the energy market is being hit on both ends: on the supply side,…

  • California's Nuclear Power Woes

    What a difference a year makes. In early 2011, America’s nuclear energy community and its proponents were cautiously hoping that America’s troubled nuclear power industry could experience a renaissance, 32 years after Three Mile Island and 25 years after Chernobyl, the U.S. and USSR’s worst nuclear catastrophes. Given the rising concern about global warming, nuclear advocates never ceased to point out that nuclear power plants (NPPs) produced zero greenhouse gas emissions, unlike fossil fuel fired thermal power plants burning coal or oil. And then, on 11 March 2011, an earthquake and subsequent tsunami effectively destroyed Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s six…

  • Brazil's Clean Energy Revolution - Infographic

    Brazil is the fifth largest country in the world, has the sixth largest economy, and is therefore quickly becoming an important global power. However not only does it have a large developing economy, it has also one of the largest renewable energy industries in the world; an industry that has enabled it to achieve energy independence, and therefore granted it a unique and powerful position in international politics. With large oil, hydroelectric, and biofuel sectors, the country tries to make the most of its natural resources to ensure a level of energy security. The following infographic details Brazil’s energy matrix,…

  • Time to Switch to Switchgrass

    Scientists in the United States announced plans to use remote sensing data to map grasslands in and around Nebraska in order to determine what areas are best suited for cellulosic biofuel derived from switchgrass. USGS officials said it would take much of the "guesswork" out of deciding where to plant crops for the use of biofuels on U.S. grasslands. With what could be considered standard forms of alternative energy -- wind and solar power -- gaining momentum, most of the guesswork for biofuels may be in its future. Expensive gasoline does strange things to U.S. consumers. It prompts them to do…

  • German Nuclear Plans Reveal Deep Flaws

    Ten months ago, in the wake of Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) disaster two months earlier, German Chancellor Angela Merkel announced that Germany would close all of its 19 NPPs between 2015 and 2022. It was an audacious move, as Germany’s NPPs produce about 28 percent of the country's electricity, but Merkel’s government felt it was necessary in order to forestall a similar fate overtaking one of the nation’s nuclear installations. Amid the glare of worldwide publicity, one fact largely overlooked was that nine German NPPs will still be operating for up to a decade. With 10 other German…

  • South Korea's Nuclear Energy Dilemma - Salesmanship Post-Fukushima

    Prosperous, energy poor South Korea, largely bereft of indigenous energy resources, is forced to compete in an increasingly turbulent world market. As the U.S. Energy Information Administration notes, “South Korea was the world’s tenth largest energy consumer in 2008, and with its lack of domestic reserves, Korea is one of the top energy importers in the world. The country is the fifth largest importer of crude oil, the third largest importer of coal, and the second largest importer of liquefied natural gas (LNG). South Korea has no international oil or natural gas pipelines, and relies exclusively on tanker shipments of LNG…

  • Transportation Sector isn't Driving Green Economy

    Europe in the age of austerity is slashing subsidies for renewable energy programs. The IEA argues that as renewables become more affordable, government support is waning. This trend suggests at least parts of the economy are starting to witness a sea change in how governments are fueling growth. With the share of renewables in the global energy mix increasing, the playing field with hydrocarbons is becoming more even. But until those trends start to spill over to the transportation sector, global ambitions for a low-carbon economy may be stifled. The International Energy Agency expects renewable energy to account for more than…

  • China Now World's Leader in Wind Power

    While Western analysts remain transfixed by China’s seemingly inexhaustible voracious appetite for the world’s hydrocarbon resources, a quiet green revolution has been taking place in the Celestial Kingdom. According to figures released last week by the China Wind Energy Association, last year China consolidated its position as the world's wind power leader in both newly and cumulative installed capacities, installing an impressive 17.6 gigawatts of wind turbines. Although the 2011 electrical generation figures were down 6.9 percent from 2010, by the end of 2011 the added production capability took China's cumulative installed wind power electrical generation to 62.4 gigawatts, up 39.4…

  • CERN Could be About to Start Researching LENR Following Recent Colloquium

    Settle in, CERN the multinational research group based in Europe had a colloquium on Low Energy Nuclear Reactions last Thursday.  There was no big news, but there is interesting news out of Japan.  The file downloads are a treasure trove of useful information. To start is the 40-page PDF presentation by Yogendra Srivastava from the University of Perugia.  The file is a set of the slides shown during the presentation and is complete enough to get a good feel for the narrative.  This is the first complete enough and extensive enough presentation to put real confidence into the Widom Preperata –…

  • U.S. Military Gets Serious About Biofuels

    Biofuels, long struggling with a plethora of problems, may finally be seeing the light at the end of the tunnel, as the largest fuel consumer, in the U.S, the Pentagon, is seeking proposals. Last month U.S. Army Energy Initiatives Task Force (AEITF) issued a draft request for proposals (Draft RFP) renewable energy contracts. What’s on offer? Over the next decade, an impressive $7 billion. During the AEITF’s pre-solicitation phase, the Draft RFP is designed to gather information from potential bidders to assist the AEITF to develop a formal Request for Proposal (RFP) that it intends to issue later this year.  The United…